A wave of death in Sweden’s nursing homes has exposed holes in a famously generous safety net.

In the popular imagination, Sweden does not seem like the sort of country prone to accepting the mass death of grandparents to conserve resources in a pandemic.

Swedes pay some of the highest taxes on earth in exchange for extensive government services, including state-furnished health care.

Yet among the nearly 6,000 people whose deaths have been linked to the coronavirus in Sweden, 2,694, or more than 45 percent, had been among the country’s most vulnerable citizens — those living in nursing homes.

That tragedy is in part the story of how Sweden has, over decades, gradually yet relentlessly downgraded its famously generous social safety net.

Since a financial crisis in the early 1990s, Sweden has slashed taxes and diminished government services. It has handed responsibility for the care of older people — mostly living at home — to strapped municipal governments, while opening up nursing homes to for-profit businesses. They

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Thinking About The Next Wave Of “Built-For-Rent” Housing

It’s the newest, hottest trend in residential development, so new that it does not yet have a standardized abbreviation, talked about by various players as BFR, B2R, or BTR. The dramatic emergence of “built-for-rent” single-family over the past eight years is supported by voracious demand, but the participants in this space will need to pick their strategies skillfully and think increasingly in terms of diversification, niches, and even new methods of production.

The demand for newly-built rental homes is being fueled in part by the wave of millennials who are finally forming families. Many of them are having kids now, which is driving them to want to have a home in the suburbs, with a yard, other kids in the neighborhood, parks nearby, and good schools. Adding to

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Report: Court intervention could prevent eviction wave

BOSTON (SHNS) – The Massachusetts judiciary should intervene to prevent a potential surge of tens of thousands of housing removals that could hit when the state’s temporary ban on evictions and foreclosures expires this month, a regional planning agency urged in a new report.

At least 80,000 households in Massachusetts, including both renters and homeowners, will struggle to cover the costs of both housing and basic needs this month, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council concluded after studying unemployment and Census Bureau data.

With the moratorium expiring on Oct. 17, it is likely too late for policy solutions such as increasing rental assistance, offering legal assistance to tenants, or implementing foreclosure protection for struggling landlords, the council representing 101 cities and towns in the greater Boston region said.

Instead, the group directed its message to the state’s Housing Court and to the Baker administration.

Judicial leaders should delay all non-essential eviction

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Nev. Lenders Must Brace For The Next Wave Of Foreclosures


By Amy Sorenson, Kelly Dove and Tanya Lewis

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Law360 (October 6, 2020, 3:50 PM EDT) —

Amy Sorenson
Amy Sorenson
Kelly Dove
Kelly Dove
Tanya Lewis
Tanya Lewis

Nevada was an epicenter of the Great Recession and housing crisis of 2008-2009. Home prices plummeted, accompanied by widespread job losses and decreases in income. Homeowners defaulted on mortgages and, in some cases, walked away from their homes.

With such significant personal and financial impacts on borrowers also came significant financial impacts on lenders. While the effects of mortgage defaults were widely reported, lenders also sustained substantial losses as the

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Tucson faces potential wave of homelessness, foreclosures as pandemic drags on | News

Emilio Bustamante was online teaching fifth graders about rectangular prisms when the constable knocked.

The 47-year-old math and science teacher with Sunnyside Unified School District knew an eviction had been ordered, but on that Monday morning nearly a month ago, he thought he had more time.

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey‘s executive order helped Pima County Constable Marge Cummings delay an eviction during the weeks it took Bustamante’s court case to reach its end, but the outcome was still the same: The Bustamante family became homeless during the pandemic because of lost income.

“I was naive I guess,” Bustamante said. “I felt safe, I felt like the order was protecting me and the constable was protecting me, which she was up to that point.”

What he’d needed to avoid the overwhelming stress that ensued, and the eviction now on his record, was simply enough time back at teaching to earn a

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‘Wave of foreclosures’ expected to hit commercial real estate market

The pandemic has hit commercial properties hard – especially restaurants, retailers and hotels, which are having a hard time making mortgage payments because of reduced business.



a tall building: The office building at 580 Westlake Park was purchased with a $91 million loan that was packaged into a commercial mortgage-backed security. The property has entered foreclosure, due to high vacancy rates. Its problems preceded the pandemic and the resulting economic crisis, but as cash-strapped commercial tenants are missing lease payments and their landlords are missing mortgage payments, experts fear more properties will follow its path in upcoming months.


© Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle / Staff Photographer

The office building at 580 Westlake Park was purchased with a $91 million loan that was packaged into a commercial mortgage-backed security. The property has entered foreclosure, due to high vacancy rates. Its problems preceded the pandemic and the resulting economic crisis, but as cash-strapped commercial tenants are missing lease payments and their landlords are missing mortgage payments, experts fear more properties will follow its path in upcoming months.


As a result, the industry is facing a “wave of foreclosures” over the next several quarters, according to securities data company Trepp, which warned that “borrowers may be strategically defaulting on their loans.”

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Borrowers with loans coming due in 2021 or before have stopped making

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