United States Department of Housing and Urban Development

Cabinet department in the Executive branch of the United States federal government

The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is a Cabinet department in the executive branch of the United States federal government. Although its beginnings were in the House and Home Financing Agency, it was founded as a Cabinet department in 1965, as part of the “Great Society” program of President Lyndon Johnson, to develop and execute policies on housing and metropolises.

History[edit]

The department was established on September 9, 1965, when Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Department of Housing and Urban Development Act[1] into law. It stipulated that the department was to be created no later than November 8, sixty days following the date of enactment. The actual implementation was postponed until January 14, 1966,

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Urban wildfire: When homes are the fuel for a runaway blaze, how do you rebuild a safer community?

TALENT, Oregon — Late morning on Sept. 8, forest scientist Dominick DellaSala sat at the desk in his home office to do a final edit on a newspaper opinion piece. The topic: The need to better prepare for catastrophic wildfires — or “black swan events” — that can rampage through neighborhoods.

His computer screen went dark. The power had gone out.

He went outside to investigate the outage. Looking south, he spotted a dense cloud of smoke.

“This was totally black. It was huge. And it was heading in our direction,” DellaSala recalls.

DellaSala spent the next few hours up on his roof, cleaning out gutters and hosing down the asphalt shingles before evacuating. His home was spared as the fire veered away from his street, but more than 2,800 structures and three people were killed in one of the most destructive wildfires in Northwest history.

https://www.seattletimes.com/Forest scientist Dominick DellaSala surveys the field near  a dog park that was the ignition point for the Almeda Fire, one of the most destructive in Oregon’s history. (Hal Bernton / The Seattle Times)
Forest scientist Dominick DellaSala
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Weakened home affordability could impact urban flight





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HUD.gov / U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)

 

 

Facing Foreclosure

You worked hard to save and purchase a home – but financial hardships can happen to anyone and now you’ve fallen behind so your lender has decided to foreclose. Your first step now should be to contact a HUD-approved housing counseling agency. Foreclosure is a process most lenders would like to avoid. There may be options available to you, and the earlier you see a housing counselor, the broader the range of those options.

HUD Foreclosure Counseling Outcome Study 
2 NeighborWorks® America: National Foreclosure Mitigation Counseling Program Evaluation (Final Report – Sep. 2014)

Be PREPARED. Not Scared.

Your HUD-Certified housing counselor can help you navigate the foreclosure process by opening up the lines of communication, and may be able to request additional time to review your situation and negotiate a resolution. Depending on your situation, you may be able to retain your home or reach an alternative

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Avoiding Foreclosure | HUD.gov / U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)

Avoiding Foreclosure

 

There are a number of programs to assist homeowners who are at risk of foreclosure and otherwise struggling with their monthly mortgage payments. The majority of these programs are administered through the U.S. Treasury Department and HUD. This page provides a summary of these various programs. Please continue reading in order to determine which program can best assist you.

Please read FHA’s brochure, “Save Your Home: Tips to Avoid Foreclosure,” also published in Spanish, Chinese and Vietnamese.


Making Home Affordable

The Making Home Affordable © (MHA) Program is a broad strategy to help homeowners avoid foreclosure, stabilize the country’s housing market, and improve the nation’s economy.

Homeowners can lower their monthly mortgage payments and get into more stable loans at today’s low rates. And for those homeowners for whom homeownership is no longer affordable or desirable, the program can provide a way out which avoids foreclosure. Additionally, in

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