ALTO Real Estate Funds is Expanding Its Acquisitions Team to Support Its Efforts to Venture Into Industrial Real Estate

Appoints industrial Real Estate professional Andre Ciani as Director of Acquisitions.

ALTO Real Estate Funds is welcoming Andre Ciani, to ALTO’s team as Director of Acquisitions. Prior to ALTO, Mr. Ciani worked for 8 years at Berkeley Partners, a San Francisco-based Real Estate private equity firm that focuses on acquiring and managing industrial assets across the United States. While at Berkeley, Mr. Ciani helped the company increase its AUM from $50M to $1B, developing extensive experience in acquisitions, financing, asset management, leasing, and dispositions. Mr. Ciani holds a BA in Economics Magna Cum Laude from Columbia University. Andre’s strong track record coupled with an extensive understanding of the US Real Estate industrial market and deep industry relationships will help steer ALTO’s Acquisition portfolio towards acquiring industrial properties in addition to open-air shopping centers. Mr. Ciani will be based in Miami, FL.

Andre Ciani will join the team together

Read More Read more

What McLaren’s factory sale means for the future of the F1 team

After all, the impact of the financial crisis caused by the coronavirus pandemic had hit the McLaren group’s automotive and racing operations hard – prompting it to plan for 1,200 redundancies and needing to arrange a £150 million loan off the National Bank of Bahrain.

While such measures were not ideal, they did mean at least that once the road car operation started up again and racing got underway, McLaren was able to put any financial uncertainties to one side.

So when news that a ‘For Sale’ sign was being put up at the McLaren Technology Centre, it was easy to conclude that perhaps the team’s economic situation was not as rosy as it had earlier appeared, as there was clearly a need for it to raise the £200 million it hopes to get for it.

Yet rather than this being a knee-jerk measure to get some fast cash, the

Read More Read more

Spotlight Team probe: Potential Medicaid discrimination at Massachusetts nursing homes

The replies etched a clear pattern. Nursing homes were more than twice as likely to say they had no room when responding to inquiries from families saying they planned to pay for care with Medicaid — the government health program relied on by low-income residents — rather than paying privately.

Often the difference wasn’t subtle. In some cases, employees from the same facility would tell the daughter of a purported Medicaid applicant that there was a waiting list, while telling the daughter of a private payer, who could be expected to pay the nursing home nearly twice as much, she would be happy to discuss the options.

Discrimination against applicants covered by Medicaid has existed for years in the nursing home industry, say advocates for the elderly, and it can be illegal.

Massachusetts adopted explicit protections in 1994, barring nursing homes from discriminating against “any Medicaid recipient or person eligible

Read More Read more