City of Norman sued over mask mandate inside private homes

NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — The leader of a group that tried to recall the mayor of Norman and three city councilors is suing the city over an ordinance requiring masks be worn in private homes if more than 25 people are present.



FILE - In this June 9, 2020 file photo, Norman Mayor Breea Clark listens during a city council meeting in Norman, Okla. The Norman City Council has voted to require masks be worn inside personal homes if more than 25 people are present in an effort to slow the spread of the coronavirus. The council voted 5-3 Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2020, for the ordinance that takes effect immediately and expires Nov. 30, 2020, despite objections from residents that such a requirement violates their constitutional rights. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki File)


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FILE – In this June 9, 2020 file photo, Norman Mayor Breea Clark listens during a city council meeting in Norman, Okla. The Norman City Council has voted to require masks be worn inside personal homes if more than 25 people are present in an effort to slow the spread of the coronavirus. The council voted 5-3 Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2020, for the ordinance that takes effect immediately and expires Nov. 30, 2020, despite objections from residents that such a requirement violates their constitutional rights. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki File)

The lawsuit filed Thursday by Unite Norman co-founder Sassan Moghadam alleges the Sept. 22

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How Bruce Kenan sued for a tax bargain on his Skaneateles Lake homes; “a slap in everybody else’s face”

In 2018, Skaneateles town officials raised the property tax assessment on Destiny USA partner Bruce Kenan’s two lakefront mansions to $7 million.

Unhappy with that, Kenan went to court and argued that was too high, that they really should be valued at $2.7 million. They settled somewhere in the middle: $4.7 million.

Then, less than a year later, Kenan put the properties up for sale.

Kenan’s asking price? $8.4 million.

That’s three times the amount he argued in court they were worth.

The Kenans are like other wealthy landowners in New York who use their money and lawyers to negotiate more favorable tax bills, town Assessor Michael Maxwell said.

Maxwell said he sees it again and again in Skaneateles and in Lake George, a ritzy Adirondack town where he is also a part-time assessor.

“The whole thing to me is just a slap in everybody else’s face,” Maxwell said.

Kenan’s

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