This Is The Secret To Andrew Ragusa’s Success In The World Of Real Estate

NEW YORK, NY / ACCESSWIRE / October 12, 2020 / It’s what basketball players do. It’s what hockey players do. It’s what marching band musicians do. Pivot. But businessmen? Yes!

Andrew Ragusa is the owner of REMI Realty, a full service real estate brokerage firm, and Assets for Opportunity, a hot trending real estate investment fund. Pivot is what he’s done to remain, and even increase, profitability during the pandemic.

“I found myself looking at the appointment book, and everything was crossed out. Something had to change,” says Andrew.

The change took the form of a pivot – changing directions while keeping the focus, drive, and goals the same: Provide a great service, grow the business, help others. While everyone stayed home – Andrew started to change what “home” meant to many. Seizing the opportunity to help people find space, he began assisting the “migration” out of many of the

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Creative placemaking could be the key to catalyzing real estate development on Chicago’s South Side. One success story is garnering international acclaim

CHICAGO — It’s no secret that some of Chicago’s 77 neighborhoods have suffered from a certain level of financial disinvestment, often systemic and spread out over decades.

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But one Chicagoan’s efforts to inject new enthusiasm and a sense of community, anchored by artistic and cultural endeavors, are attracting global attention — and similar efforts might be the key to stimulating more equitable real estate development on Chicago’s South Side, a new report suggests.

The report reflects three years of studying creative placemaking and the impact it has on communities. It comes from the Urban Land Institute, a global organization of real estate and urban development professionals dedicated to the responsible use of land in creating and sustaining thriving communities.

ULI reports that cities are finding success with the concept of placemaking, in which developers, designers, planners and investors come together to sync up their efforts in residential, commercial

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Creative placemaking could be the key to catalyzing real estate development on Chicago’s South Side. Here’s how one success story is garnering international acclaim.

It’s no secret that some of Chicago’s 77 neighborhoods have suffered from a certain level of financial disinvestment, often systemic and spread out over decades.



a person standing in front of a window: Dance instructors Daniel "Bravemonk" Haywood and Kelsa "K-Soul" Robinson on Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020 at the Dorchester Art + Housing Collaborative.


© Brian Cassella / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Dance instructors Daniel “Bravemonk” Haywood and Kelsa “K-Soul” Robinson on Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020 at the Dorchester Art + Housing Collaborative.

But one Chicagoan’s efforts to inject new enthusiasm and a sense of community, anchored by artistic and cultural endeavors, are attracting global attention — and similar efforts might be the key to stimulating more equitable real estate development on Chicago’s South Side, a new report suggests.

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The report reflects three years of studying creative placemaking and the impact it has on communities. It comes from the Urban Land Institute, a global organization of real estate and urban development professionals dedicated to the responsible use of land in creating and sustaining thriving communities.

ULI reports that

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