State by State Requirement, Contractor Boards

Contractor license requirements vary state by state, and what applies in one state is therefore not necessarily the case in the neighboring state. Where some states require general contractors to have a license, others don’t, or they might simply be regulated at the local level – again a state by state determination.

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FBI, state agents raid Borrego Community Healthcare Foundation and El Cajon billing contractor

State and federal agents raided the offices Tuesday of the Borrego Community Healthcare Foundation, a nonprofit provider in Borrego Springs that last year billed more than $300 million in medical, dental and other services to the U.S. government.

Dozens of agents turned up at the organization’s administrative offices on Palm Canyon Drive first thing in the morning, seizing computers and boxes of medical records and interviewing employees who were not alerted to the search in advance.

Investigators also closed off the Borrego Medical Clinic a few miles to the southeast of the downtown Borrego Springs area, carting away files and other material.

Separate search warrants were executed at the foundation’s administrative offices off Sky Park Court in Kearny Mesa and at the El Cajon headquarters of Premier Healthcare Management, a management services company that provides billing and other services to the nonprofit.

FBI spokeswoman Davene Butler acknowledged warrants were served

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State of Oregon: Contractor tools

When written contracts are required

  • All contracts on a residential structure that exceed $2,000 must be written. 
  • If the original contract price is less than $2,000 but the price goes up during the project and eventually exceeds $2,000,  you must provide the owner a written contract within five days. (ORS 701.305) 
  • If you do not have a written contract as required, you cannot claim a lien. (ORS 87.037) 

Put all contracts in writing 

A well-written contract helps avoid homeowner complaints. It protects both you and the consumer by specifying what has been agreed to. 

Required terms

If you work on residential properties, you must include the following in your written contract: 

  • Your name, address, phone number, and CCB license number (as shown on CCB records)
  • The customer’s name and address where the work will be performed
  • A description of the work to be performed, the
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North Korea’s Kim pledges thousands of new homes in storm recovery effort: state media

By Sangmi Cha

SEOUL (Reuters) – North Korean leader Kim Jong Un promised to help typhoon-hit areas recover and to build at least 25,000 houses over the next five years, state media said on Wednesday.

Visiting one of the worst-hit areas of North Korea, Kim expressed regret over the more than 50-year-old houses in which people have been living and urged the military to embark on a more ambitious construction plan, KCNA said.

The visit came after Kim appeared to shed tears at the weekend as he thanked citizens for their sacrifices, in the most striking demonstration yet of how he is relying on his “man-of- the-people” persona to tackle his country’s deepening crises.

The military has reached a construction level of 60% for at least 2,300 houses in the Komdok area in South Hamgyong province, northeast of the capital, Pyongyang, the state media said.

Kim said new houses were

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State lifts curbs on indoor visits to senior homes, but urges caution

Despite an alarming surge in coronavirus cases, Gov. Tim Walz’s administration is rolling back a heart-wrenching policy that prevented families from visiting their loved ones in nursing homes and assisted-living facilities during the pandemic.

The Minnesota Department of Health issued new guidelines Monday that allow indoor visits at most senior homes that have not had new COVID-19 infections in the preceding two weeks and the infection rate in the surrounding county is no more than 10%. But the state recommends that long-term care facilities limit how many visitors a resident can have at one time, as well as the duration of indoor visits.

The guidance was issued in response to a new federal policy and significantly eases restrictions in place since March, when nursing homes and assisted-living complexes across the state shut down and barred family visits in an attempt to protect older residents who are particularly vulnerable to the

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Nearly three times more COVID deaths in Mississippi’s for-profit nursing homes, analysis shows | State Government

Twice as many residents caught COVID-19 at Mississippi’s for-profit nursing homes, and nearly three times more died there, an analysis of health data by the Mississippi Center for Investigative Reporting shows.

The average number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in these for-profit homes? Four in 10 residents.

One possible factor: 80% of Mississippi’s nursing homes had already been cited for infection-control problems before the pandemic hit.

Charlene Harrington, a professor emeritus at the University of California at San Francisco who discovered similar results in a just-released study of nursing homes in California, said the current pandemic is exposing problems that have persisted for decades. “We’ve just looked the other way for 30 years,” she said.

OSHA has been investigating three nursing homes in Mississippi, all of them for-profit, for workplace catastrophes or fatalities, including Lakeside Health & Rehabilitation Center in Quitman. One of the home’s nursing assistants, Carole Faye Doby of

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Demonstrators call for state to extend moratorium on evictions and foreclosures

With the state moratorium on evictions set to expire on Oct. 17, nearly 100 protesters gathered outside the Park Street MBTA station at Boston Common on Sunday in support of a bill that would extend the ban.

The crowd surrounded a 6-foot sign reading, “Eviction Free Zone” and carried many handmade banners and placards supporting the bill, including several that said, “Stop 100,000+ Evictions.”

Advocates said the bill, which still needs to pass both branches of the Legislature and get approval by Governor Charlie Baker, would spare more than 100,000 households struggling due to the pandemic from displacement.

“We are just so anxious about what’s going to happen after Oct. 17,” said Lisa Owens, executive director of City Life/Vida Urbana, the tenants’ rights group that planned Sunday’s event.

“This is a crisis we can avert,” she said in a phone interview before the rally. “The clock is ticking,”

As the

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Montana’s care homes struggle with staffing and ever-changing regulations as COVID-19 cases rise | State & Regional

During the first three months of the pandemic, Coe kept a bed in his office because he didn’t want to infect his family and wanted to reassure his staff he was there for them.

“Health care and our industry didn’t bring this to the state, but we’re living with choices everybody makes whether you gown up, mask up, you wash your hands — whatever happens, if it gets into the facility, we have to live with whatever happens,” Coe said.

‘Staff doesn’t grow on trees’

The Montana Health Care Association serves long-term care facilities in the state, and many have reached out to get answers and support, according to Rose Hughes, the association’s executive director.

“To me it has just brought forth a whole new experience and lots of questions about how should these things be handled,” Hughes said in an interview in September. “What can you do? Because staff

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State cites former Flint water service line contractor for soil erosion at old dump site

FLINT, MI – A former contractor that excavated water service lines in Flint has been cited by the state for not having a soil erosion and sediment control permit for property it owns in the city, a site that was used to dump construction waste.

The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy notified W.T. Stevens Construction Inc. of its violation of the Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act for its property in the area of Premier Street and East Mott Avenue, just east of Horton Avenue, in a Sept. 30 letter. That’s near I-475 and East Pierson Road on the city’s north side.

The company was awarded contracts worth more than $27 million to replace lead and galvanized water service lines in Flint starting in 2017.

For most of this year, the company and the city have been locked in disagreements over the condition of the former dump

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Trump health official blasts Nevada after state ends use of rapid coronavirus tests in nursing homes

A top official from the Department of Health and Human Services on Friday urged Nevada to reverse its decision to suspend the use of two rapid coronavirus tests in nursing homes, saying there is no “scientific reason” to justify its action.



Brett Giroir wearing a suit and tie: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ADM Brett P. Giroir testifies before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce on the Trump Administration's Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, June 23, 2020.


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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ADM Brett P. Giroir testifies before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce on the Trump Administration’s Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, June 23, 2020.

Nevada health officials have ordered nursing facilities in the state to immediately suspend the use of two tests, manufactured by companies Quidel and Becton, Dickinson and Co., after the officials said the tests repeatedly delivered false positives.

Nevada officials said 23 out of 39 positive antigen test results from both Quidel and BD were later found by PCR to be negative, according to a directive issued

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