Dover Doins: Small cottage homes could help fill a big need – News – fosters.com

There are many discussions about these two words: perception and reality. They came to my mind while reading some reactions shared on social media, particularly about the proposal for 44 single-family “cottages” to be built in Dover. They are described as a cluster of “single family detached cottages” 384 square feet each, with kitchen/living room, bedroom and bath.

The developers are proposing these as addressing need for affordable housing locally.

Let’s talk about living in this modest space and the reaction by many members of the social media. Some yeah, some nay, and of course, as is the nature of the beast, many suggesting changes.

The first qualification popping up is of course, money. Here’s where our first thoughts of perception and reality come in. It is suggested that these homes will be rentals as opposed to purchased units.

The developers suggest $800 to $1,000 per month rent as something

Read More Read more

America’s Small Colleges Were Already Hurting Pre-Covid. Things Are About To Get Worse.

There was history underfoot at Vermont’s Marlboro College. Tucked away in the Green Mountains, the nonprofit institution founded at the end of World War II held its first graduation in 1948. Robert Frost read a poem at the ceremony and Life Magazine printed a picture of its lone alum: a former rifleman named Hugh Mulligan who spent the years after the war hobnobbing in Paris with the likes of Picasso and studied Shakespeare in operatic form. 

Mulligan died in 2008. And now Marlboro is gone too, shuttered after this year’s spring semester following years of fiscal turmoil. The bucolic 533-acre campus was sold for $1.725 million in cash and debt, plus operating expenses—a sum reportedly “far below the property’s assessed value.”

It’s hardly alone. At least a dozen independent, regional colleges are on the brink of collapse—mostly in the northeast—and all buckling from the one-two punch of dwindling enrollment

Read More Read more

Save on cookware, small appliances and more

Shop and save at Macy’s during the VIP Sale. (Photo: All-Clad / Macy’s)

— Recommendations are independently chosen by Reviewed’s editors. Purchases you make through our links may earn us a commission.

The countdown to Amazon Prime Day is on, but you don’t have to wait to start saving at Macy’s. Thanks to the store’s huge VIP Sale, which is happening now through Tuesday, October 6, you can take an additional 10%, 15%, 25% or 30% off select items and use the promo code VIP to score even bigger savings.

Need help finding products? Sign up for our weekly newsletter. It’s free and you can unsubscribe at any time.

You can get massive discounts on top-rated home, fashion and beauty products during this dynamite endeavor. For example, you could score an exquisite seven-piece All-Clad cookware set, originally $839.99, and on sale for $499.99, for $374.99 with the coupon code, … Read More

Read more

What to Know When Buying a for Sale by Owner Business | Small Business

Buying a company can put you in business quickly. You have the advantage of stepping into a working concern with inventory, sales, product recognition and a supply chain already in place. However, you still need to do your due diligence, especially when buying directly from the owner. Have your questions ready when you begin sizing up a for-sale-by-owner business, and you can navigate your way through common pitfalls.

Why the Owner is Selling

You should ask an owner why the business is for sale. According to the company Fair Market Valuations, which focuses on businesses that are for sale, business owners sell for common reasons. These include owner burnout, retirement, illness or family issues, a declining customer base, new competition, the owner’s long-term exit plan and the desire to take profits by selling. As you can see, some of these reasons bode well for you, but others, such as losing

Read More Read more

Small homes made of Maine materials could boost economy, aid climate, council says

The Maine Climate Council has suggested a strategy that draws on the potential for constructing fuel efficient, modestly priced homes with locally sourced wood to help address the state’s affordable housing shortage while boosting the economy.



a truck is parked on the side of a building


© Provided by Washington Examiner


Sustainably harvested wood – particularly when transport is minimal – is more sensible when compared with steel and concrete, which have a denser carbon footprint, Stephen Shaler, associate director of the Advanced Structures and Composites Center at the University of Maine, told the Maine Monitor.

Loading...

Load Error

Using locally sourced wood to build homes could expand job opportunities in construction, design and forest products, revitalize former mill towns, help trade school programs and strengthen university research and development, the climate council reported.

While Maine is known for producing traditional hardwood from spruce and pine, engineered wood like laminated strand lumber is a newer industry. Wood fiber

Read More Read more