How Do Real-Estate Agents Show Homes During Covid? With Face Masks, Gloves and Some Ingenuity

Heather T. Roy & Learka Bosnak

Ms. Bosnak: Heather and I have been working together for 15 years and we are very comfortable doing showings together. Then Covid shut everything down. We did a showing and I came back completely frustrated, because we were wearing masks. I felt muzzled. I was constantly running around saying, “I’m smiling under here!” This business is all about rapport, comfort level.

Ms. Roy: We’re like, “We need new skills. We need people to know what we’re thinking, and we also need to know what they’re thinking.” It was almost like we needed a body language expert. I am single and I had met with a couple of matchmakers in L.A. One had her clients meet with a body language expert—Mark Edgar Stephens.

Ms. Bosnak: Heather’s still single, but we love this guy.

Ms. Roy: So we called Mark and told him what we were

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The Pandemic Sparks a Real-Estate Gold Rush in Upstate New York

In her late-career novel “Hudson River Bracketed,” Edith Wharton memorialized the landscape just north of New York City—the “precipitate plunge of many-tinted forest, the great sweep of the Hudson, and the cliffs on its other shore.” In Wharton’s time, upstate was where Manhattan’s wealthy migrated seasonally, taking trains to enormous homes like Wyndcliffe, in Rhinebeck—the stolid mansion of Wharton’s aunt, Elizabeth Schermerhorn Jones, which is said to be the source of the phrase “keeping up with the Joneses”—or the Mills family’s sixty-five-room Staatsburgh mansion, designed by McKim, Mead, and White and thought to be the inspiration for Bellomont in “The House of Mirth.” If they didn’t decamp to Beaux-Arts piles, they sought “the elaborate rusticity of an Adirondack camp,” as Wharton put it in that novel. For the gentry, leaving the city was practically compulsory, she wrote in “The Custom of the Country”: “In the early summer New York was

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Robert Covington And Luol Deng Invest In Real-Estate Fund Aiming To Revitalize Chicago

In September, Own Our Own, an inner-city-focused real-estate fund, announced its first Chicago-based project in partnership with the Houston Rockets’ Robert Covington and former Chicago Bull Luol Deng. Further strengthening the project is a partnership with the Chicago Urban League and the NBPA Foundation, which will fund initiatives around physical fitness and mentorship. 

After being drafted to the Bulls in 2004, Deng spent his first ten years in Chicago, and he signed a one-day

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The Hot New Real-Estate Investment Is in Keeping Food Chilled

Cold storage is becoming one of the hottest real-estate investments during the pandemic.

Lineage Logistics LLC, the world’s largest landlord of temperature-controlled warehouses, concluded a fundraising round last month that brought in $1.6 billion. It is expected to pursue a public offering, according to commercial real-estate analytics firm Green Street.

Americold Realty Trust,

the only publicly listed cold-storage real-estate investment trust, recorded a 6% increase in net operating income in the second quarter. Together, the two firms have 59% of the cold-storage market share in the U.S. and are growing quickly.

Fans of this niche sector say the pandemic showed it can readily adapt to new customers and environments.

Cold-storage warehouses, which are similar to industrial warehouses but are refrigerated to store goods that need to remain fresh or frozen, usually cater to food producers, food wholesalers and retailers such as grocers, restaurants and other bulk buyers. But during

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Luxury Real-Estate Market Surges In The Hamptons

Nobody knew what was in store at the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic in March, but when schools and offices shut down and the threat of the virus in New York City was greater than ever, many wealthy families beelined to their Hamptons homes. 

Always a sought-after destination between Memorial Day Weekend and Labor Day Weekend, the Hamptons is relatively quiet in March and April and is nearly vacant in the winter months. With Covid-19 still a looming threat, many city dwellers are taking advantage of the seclusion in the Hamptons and renting in the off-season this winter and even up to a year. 

Since March, the market has been fierce, with many bidding wars and sales over asking prices due to low inventory and high demand.

“Once the stay-at-home order

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Real-Estate Agents Move Mountains to Sell High-Altitude Homes

Q: What obstacles have you encountered while selling homes in the mountains?

Kristina Bergstand

Real estate broker, Compass in Lake Tahoe

I was showing a house under construction to some clients. There were contractors in the house working, but they had left their lunch in the living space. We walked in and it was not one bear, but three bears, in the house eating their lunch. Literally three huge bears, in the house. We screamed, we ran and jumped in the car. I think it was a mama and two cubs, but they were not small cubs. They were large.

Finally the contractors saw them somehow, or maybe heard us scream, and kind of shoed them out. They meandered out, one by one, and went on their merry way. It was crazy. In the middle of the day. We hung out and waited for them to leave and then we

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Commercial Real-Estate Fallout Even Douses the Queen of England

Office Workers Are Again Told to Work from Home, Retailers Don’t Pay Rents, UK Commercial Property Owners Sink Deeper into the Mire.

By Nick Corbishley, for WOLF STREET:

Crown Estates, which manages the Queen of England’s portfolio, recently wrote down the value of 17 shopping and leisure centers by 17%, cutting Her Majesty’s net worth by £552 million. As The Economist points out, this is “fairly small beer” set against the £13.4 billion valuation of the Queen’s property portfolio, which includes some of London’s toniest real estate.

But the Queen will not be left out of pocket, since her income — set at 25% of the profits generated by the Crown Estate — will be topped up with a taxpayer bailout. In fact, thanks to the Sovereign Grant Act of 2011, the overall amount given to the Queen each year in order to fund her official duties is never allowed

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