Couple says they faced discrimination in home appraisal because of wife’s race

This report is part of “Turning Point,” a groundbreaking series by ABC News examining the racial reckoning sweeping the United States and exploring whether it can lead to lasting reconciliation.



a person standing in front of a building: Abena and Alex Horton requested an appraisal of their Jacksonville, Florida, home.


© ABC News
Abena and Alex Horton requested an appraisal of their Jacksonville, Florida, home.

Abena Horton and her husband, Alex Horton, recently did what many homeowners do every day: They requested an appraisal to refinance their Jacksonville, Florida, home.

On the day of the appointment, Abena Horton was there to greet the appraiser who would go over their family’s four-bedroom, four-bathroom ranch style home.

But when the Hortons got the appraisal back, they thought the price was shockingly low.

“It clicked in my mind almost immediately that I understand what the issue was here,” Abena Horton said.

Watch the full story on “Nightline” tonight at 12 a.m. ET on ABC

Abena Horton, an attorney, is Black. Her husband,

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Democratic poll shows neck-and-neck race brewing in Florida House district

An internal poll shows a tight race brewing in Florida’s 16th Congressional District between Democratic state Rep. Margaret Good and seven-term Rep. Vern BuchananVernon Gale BuchananMORE (R).

The internal poll from Good’s campaign, which was obtained exclusively by The Hill, shows Buchanan with a 48-45 advantage over Good among likely voters, a difference that falls within the survey’s margin of error. Another 7 percent remain undecided.

Good has a 47-41 lead among independents, and the two contenders are deadlocked at 47 percent support among seniors.

The result is a marginal improvement from the same poll conducted last month, which showed Buchanan with a 6-point advantage.

Buchanan’s favorability rating is even with 43 percent of voters saying they have a favorable view of him and 43 percent saying they have an unfavorable view. Thirty-nine percent of voters rate Good favorably, while 33 percent view her unfavorably. Twenty-eight percent of voters

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Ferrari’s record-breaking V-12-powered race boat is for sale

Mercedes-AMG has its branded Cigarette boats, and Honda builds outboard engines, but no automaker has a watercraft quite like this Ferrari V-12 hydroplane, dubbed Arno XI. Built in the 1950s to chase a speed record, it’s now for sale through DuPont Registry.

First spotted by Road & Track, the Arno XI was developed in-house by Ferrari in partnership with speedboat racer Achille Castoldi, who pitched the idea directly to Enzo Ferrari. The goal was to sett a world speed record in the 800-kilogram class.

Castoldi bought a 4.5-liter V-12 for the project, but Enzo had it replaced with a racing engine from the Scuderia Ferrari stable. It produced 550 to 600 horsepower in race tune, according to the listing. The engine was installed in a hardwood hydroplane hull, designed to skim over the top of the water at speed.

The Arno XI went on to set the record—hitting 150.49

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Homes in Black and Latino neighborhoods still undervalued 50 years after US banned using race in real estate appraisals | The Conversation

(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.)

Junia Howell, University of Pittsburgh and Elizabeth Korver-Glenn, University of New Mexico

(THE CONVERSATION) The Research Brief is a short take about interesting academic work.

The big idea

Racial inequality in home values is larger today than it was 40 years ago, with homes in white neighborhoods appreciating $200,000 more since 1980 than comparable homes in similar communities of color.

Our new research on home appraisals shows neighborhood racial composition still drives unequal home values, despite laws that forbid real estate professionals from explicitly using race when evaluating a property’s worth. Published in the journal Social Problems, our study finds this growing inequality results from both historical policies and contemporary practices.

In the 1930s, the federal government institutionalized a process for evaluating how much a property was worth. Often called redlining, this process used

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Homes in Black and Latino Neighborhoods Still Undervalued 50 Years After U.S. Banned Using Race In Real Estate Appraisals | Cities

By Junia Howell and Elizabeth Korver-Glenn

Our new research on home appraisals shows neighborhood racial composition still drives unequal home values, despite laws that forbid real estate professionals from explicitly using race when evaluating a property’s worth. Published in the journal Social Problems, our study finds this growing inequality results from both historical policies and contemporary practices.

In the 1930s, the federal government institutionalized a process for evaluating how much a property was worth. Often called redlining, this process used neighborhood racial and socioeconomic composition to determine home values. Homes in white communities were deemed more valuable than identical dwellings in communities of color.

Legislative action in the late 1960s and 1970s prohibited this practice. But the law allowed appraisers to use past sale prices to determine home values. Our research shows how using old, race-based sale prices ensured appraisers continued to define homes in white neighborhoods as worth more

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Race Gap in Home Appraisals Has Doubled Since 1980

Home appraisals in predominantly Black and Latino neighborhoods are veering even farther from those in majority-white neighborhoods. 

Photographer: Robert Knopes/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

U.S. fair housing laws passed in the 1960s and ‘70s were supposed to help bring racial parity to a housing market that since its beginning confined Black homebuyers to the cheapest forms of housing in the most undesirable neighborhoods. But since those laws were passed, the disparity in the appraised values between homes in majority-white and predominantly non-white neighborhoods has widened dramatically, according to a new study.

This disparity can’t be fully explained by past racially discriminatory practices in the real estate industry, such as redlining, conclude University of Pittsburgh sociologist Junia Howell and University of New Mexico sociologist Elizabeth Korver-Glenn. Instead, standard modern appraisal practices used since the passage of the Community Reinvestment Act of 1977

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