I signed my home over to my daughter temporarily to protect it during my divorce. Now I’m 69 and living in an RV. Can I file for elder abuse?

Dear Moneyist,

In 2009, when the property market was crashing, I added both my daughters to the deed of my home so I would not lose the home to foreclosure during my divorce and, in case something happened to me, my daughters could keep the home.

It was only to be a temporary fix until I could finally sell the home, and both daughters agreed to sign off on the deed. By adding my daughter it allowed me to use her income to qualify for a loan modification. I, not my daughters, made all the payments. Fast forward to 2019.

My eldest daughter had received more than $760,000 for the sale of two homes that were given to her by her deceased former mother-in-law. This daughter has always spent her money foolishly and has terrible credit. Even with all this money, no one would rent to her because of her

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Journal Times editorial: Busing prep athletes outside city doesn’t protect anyone | Editorial

A lot of wacky rules have emerged in the name of preventing the spread of COVID-19. One of the strangest involves local schools and sports.

Students at St. Catherine’s and Racine Lutheran high schools are able to play soccer, football and volleyball. But they cannot play or practice in the city.

Those two schools, unlike their Racine Unified counterparts, are allowing those sports to be played. But under the City of Racine’s Safer at Home ordinance, those “high-risk” sports cannot be played within city limits.

So to practice, Lutheran and St. Catherine’s athletes need to be transported to fields or facilities outside city limits. Likewise, there are no home games, just away games.

“If the sport/activity is not permissible under the ordinance, it doesn’t matter whose facility is used, it’s not permitted,” Racine Communications Director Shannon Powell said in early September, explaining the decision.

The list of “high-risk” activities includes

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Real estate Q&A: How can buyers protect themselves in a seller’s market? | Money

Q: We are house hunting, and our real estate agent warned us it is a “seller’s market,” and we need to decide quickly. This makes me nervous. What can we do to protect ourselves and still find a home for our family? — Gina

A: Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, or maybe because of it, many areas are experiencing a hot real estate market.

I have experienced several cycles of buyer and seller markets and have learned there are good and bad deals to be found in any market.

The basics of real estate do not change. First, remember that you are buying only one home, not the entire market. Keep looking until you find the house right for you. Homes are too expensive, and moving is too difficult to settle.

It would be best if you also kept realistic expectations. A deal that looks too good to be true invariably

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How can buyers protect themselves in a seller’s market?

Q: We are house hunting, and our real estate agent warned us it is a “seller’s market,” and we need to decide quickly. This makes me nervous. What can we do to protect ourselves and still find a home for our family? — Gina



a sign in front of a building: House for sale in Springfield, Ore.


© Handout/Dreamstime/TNS
House for sale in Springfield, Ore.

A: Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, or maybe because of it, many areas are experiencing a hot real estate market.

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I have experienced several cycles of buyer and seller markets and have learned there are good and bad deals to be found in any market.

The basics of real estate do not change. First, remember that you are buying only one home, not the entire market. Keep looking until you find the house right for you. Homes are too expensive, and moving is too difficult to settle.

It would be best if you also kept realistic expectations.

Read More Read more

Contractor scamming in ENC: What is it and how to protect yourself

GREENVILLE, N.C. (WNCT) – Contractor scams are a rising problem in eastern North Carolina. People who hire workers for projects often finding themselves in situations with loss of money, and an unfinished project.

To prevent these problems from happening, legal construction workers say it’s important to know who you’re working with.

If a contractor asks their customers for money upfront, and don’t have a legal construction license this can be a red flag.

Frank McLawhorn, owner of Frank McLawhorn Construction Inc. says when looking for a contractor, homeowners should ask for certificates, workers’ compensation, and general liability insurance.

A contractor should also be able to provide people with multiple references, and any further background information requested.

Bad workers often look for older customers or young people who may have never hired a contractor before.

Another common problem here in the East? Scammers taking advantage of people after severe weather, like

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