Infection Control Problems Persist in Nursing Homes During COVID


The new analysis draws on self-reported data from nursing homes collected by the federal government over four weeks from late August to late September. While some states fared much worse than others, all 50 states and the District of Columbia had one or more nursing homes that reported inadequate PPE supply, staff shortages, staff infections and resident cases. Forty-seven states reported at least one COVID-19 death among residents.

The analysis found that more than 28,000 residents tested positive for COVID-19 during the four-week reporting period, and more than 5,200 residents died, showing that the virus is still raging in nursing homes. More than 84,000 long-term care residents and staff have died since January, and more than 500,000 residents and staff have contracted the disease, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation’s tally, accounting for roughly 40 percent of the national death toll. Long-term care providers include assisted living, adult day care

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State of Texas: TWC contractor reveals call center problems; Senate candidates prepare for debate

AUSTIN (Nexstar) – Imagine showing up to a job where you know that almost 75% of what you do will fail someone. What if a fireman failed to help someone in three out of four fire calls? What if a police officer failed to help clear three out of four 911 calls?

Day, after day.

That’s what a contractor helping field calls for the Texas Workforce Commission told us was going on inside some of the agency’s call centers. The contractor, who asked to not be identified in this report, told KXAN the problem facing nearly every caller is that their call may be answered by people who have no way to help Texans calling for help with their unemployment problems.

This worker said they’re unable to help about three-quarters of the people who call with unemployment problems.

Since the pandemic hit in mid-March, hundreds of unemployed Texans wrote to

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Covid ‘Testing Hell’: Devices Given to Nursing Homes Bring New Problems

“There’s no mechanism in place for reporting,” said Kim Schilling, the vice president of health services at Friendship Haven, which runs a nursing home in rural Iowa. “We were on the phone yesterday trying to figure this out with the department of public health and it was very overwhelming for them too.”

Katie Smith Sloan, the president of LeadingAge, an association of nonprofit providers of aging services, said the Trump administration’s focus on fines and stringent reporting requirements were the wrong approach to addressing a crisis that was aggravated by federal inaction in the early months of the pandemic.

“For seven months, nursing homes have been saving and protecting lives while dealing with staffing shortages, testing and personal protective equipment challenges and growing unexpected costs,” she said.

David Grabowski, a health care policy expert at Harvard Medical School, described the federal rapid-test program as “a positive step but late in

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