Is It Ever Too Late to Become a Real Estate Investor?

As a general rule, the earlier in life you invest, the more opportunity you’ll give yourself to grow wealth. That applies whether you’re buying stocks, bonds, or real estate. But if you’re wondering whether there’s a cutoff age for the latter, the good news is, there isn’t. You can actually invest in real estate at any stage of life. But your approach might differ if you’re older.

Investing in real estate at a later age

When we talk about investing in real estate, there are several avenues to take. You can:

All of these are feasible at any age, so let’s explore each one. And let’s also assume you’re older — old enough to be retired, in fact.

Buying an income property

Becoming a landlord can be a full-time job, but if you no longer have a job, you might have the time to buy an income property and oversee

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Two California Homes Owned by Late Kleiner Perkins Co-founder Hit The Market

Two California properties owned by the late venture capitalist Frank J. Caufield are separately coming on the market for $39.75 million and $19.5 million.

Mr. Caufield, who died last year at 80, co-founded Silicon Valley powerhouse Kleiner Perkins Caufield and Byers, which made investments in some of tech’s best-known companies including Amazon. Mr. Caufield stepped away from his daily role at the firm, now known as Kleiner Perkins, in 2000.

The pricier of the two properties is a nearly 12-acre estate in celebrity-studded Montecito, Calif. The roughly 18,500-square-foot, nine-bedroom Italian Renaissance-inspired villa was designed around 1927 by George Washington Smith, a prominent Santa Barbara architect, according to research by Sotheby’s International Realty, which is listing both homes.


An Italian Renaissance-Inspired Montecito mansion

The villa was designed around 1927 by George Washington Smith, a prominent California architect

A Montecito, Calif., mansion dating to the 1920s is coming on the market for

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Louisiana ranks high in the US in late mortgage payments, and there’s one key factor why | Business

The number of Louisiana homeowners late on their mortgage payments remains stubbornly high and the state is still second in the nation for that metric as of August — as it was in June just three months into the economic disruptions resulting from shutdowns to slow the spread of coronavirus.

More than 11.2% of home mortgages in the state were past-due on payments or in delinquency as of August, up from 7.7% the same time last year and higher than last month’s national average of 7.27%, according to data from Black Knight, a Florida-based publicly traded technology business with access to loan-level data from some of the largest mortgage service companies.

Coming off a brief, slight decline in July, the 11.2% August rate is roughly the same as in June after furloughs and layoffs took their toll on homeowner finances, data shows. The percentage rate is about 56% higher than

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