Palm Bay to reconsider allowing hundreds of homes next to FAR Chemical after judge voids meeting

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A witness called 911 to report an explosion at a chemical plant in Palm Bay.

Wochit

Back in February, disregarding warnings of danger, the Palm Bay City Council voted 5-0 to rezone land bordering FAR Chemical’s industrial plant for construction of up to 699 homes and 190,000 square feet of commercial space.

On Sept. 8, FAR Chemical was rocked by a series of window-rattling explosions, sparking large fireballs and shutting down U.S. 1 as police and firefighters converged on the scene.

Nine days later, a Brevard County circuit judge invalidated the results of the February City Council meeting, ruling that Palm Bay officials had failed to comply with mandatory notice requirements.

Now, the City Council will re-hear the 22-acre multifamily housing-commercial construction proposal during a special meeting at 6 p.m. Tuesday.

The FAR Chemical blasts originated from an industrial storage area containing 30 to 40 50-gallon barrels of an

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Judge In Charge Of Oi Group Recovery Approves Multiple Asset Sale, Including That Of 5 Data Centers Being Executed By Piemonte Holding

SAO PAULO, Oct. 6, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Fernando Viana, the Rio de Janeiro court judge in charge of Oi Group (OIBR.C) judicial recovery, approved a multiple asset sale of R$22 billion last Monday (5), following Creditors support. The deal includes 5 Data Centers being purchased by Brazilian financial group Piemonte Holding.

Judicial approval of Oi Group asset sale (Data Centers, Oi Mobile and Towers) comes after the creditors general assembly held in September, and a statement from Rodrigo Abreu, CEO of Oi, on Friday, October 2nd, saying that the sale to Piemonte Holding, as well as the others, are a “deal done, with few steps remaining.”

The important approval from Judge Fernando Viana also comes right after a shareholders meeting of Piemonte Holding financial group ensured and expanded support to the acquisition from Oi in Judicial Recovery.

Other than voting on Oi deal support, Piemonte Holding

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Arizonans in nursing homes and hospitals can vote by video in some circumstances, judge rules

Election officials in Arizona can use videoconferencing to help some voters confined to hospitals, nursing homes or living with severe disabilities cast their ballots, a judge ruled Monday, rejecting calls to declare the new pandemic-era practice illegal.



a group of people standing in front of a sign: People wash their hands by the entrance to Sapphire of Tucson Nursing and Rehab on May 1, 2020.


© David Wallace/The Republic
People wash their hands by the entrance to Sapphire of Tucson Nursing and Rehab on May 1, 2020.

Attorney General Mark Brnovich asked the court to strike down plans adopted by the Maricopa County Recorder’s Office and Arizona Secretary of State’s Office for limited “virtual” voting assistance, arguing that state law does not allow anyone to cast a ballot by video.

Gov. Doug Ducey also opposed the policies, contending that state law requires officials provide such services in person.

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But in a ruling that reflected how unusual this election year is, Maricopa County

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Voting by video allowed in some circumstances, Arizona judge rules

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People wash their hands by the entrance to Sapphire of Tucson Nursing and Rehab on May 1, 2020. (Photo: David Wallace/The Republic)

Election officials in Arizona can use videoconferencing to help some voters confined to hospitals, nursing homes or living with severe disabilities cast their ballots, a judge ruled Monday, rejecting calls to declare the new pandemic-era practice illegal.

Attorney General Mark Brnovich asked the court to strike down plans adopted by the Maricopa County Recorder’s Office and Arizona Secretary of State’s Office for limited “virtual” voting assistance, arguing that state law does not allow anyone to cast a ballot by video.

Gov. Doug Ducey also opposed the policies, contending that state law requires officials provide such services in person.

But in a ruling that reflected how unusual this election year is, Maricopa County Superior Court Judge Randall H. Warner found that videoconferencing may be necessary for some voters

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