Development hell: Collapse of plan for Beech Brook site in Pepper Pike in face of opposition may not bode well for sale

CLEVELAND, Ohio — One of the most contentious political debates in Northeast Ohio this year is not about the presidential election, control of the Senate or even the Ohio Statehouse corruption scandal.

It’s about zoning in Pepper Pike.

Hundreds of yard signs bearing the phrase “No to Mixed-Use” are scattered throughout the small, well-to-do far-eastern suburb. They line the sidewalk-less residential streets as part of an effort that opposition organizer Manny Naft said aims to keep the city’s “bucolic” nature.

The signs refer to a measure on the Nov. 3 ballot to change the zoning for a 68-acre tract of land owned by behavioral health services nonprofit Beech Brook, along with two smaller adjoining lots. The issue has divided the community.

The division resulted in online bickering, contentious town hall meetings, threats of defamation lawsuits and even unused condoms left at Axiom Development Principal Bryan Stone’s home.

Stone, who lives

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Covid ‘Testing Hell’: Devices Given to Nursing Homes Bring New Problems

“There’s no mechanism in place for reporting,” said Kim Schilling, the vice president of health services at Friendship Haven, which runs a nursing home in rural Iowa. “We were on the phone yesterday trying to figure this out with the department of public health and it was very overwhelming for them too.”

Katie Smith Sloan, the president of LeadingAge, an association of nonprofit providers of aging services, said the Trump administration’s focus on fines and stringent reporting requirements were the wrong approach to addressing a crisis that was aggravated by federal inaction in the early months of the pandemic.

“For seven months, nursing homes have been saving and protecting lives while dealing with staffing shortages, testing and personal protective equipment challenges and growing unexpected costs,” she said.

David Grabowski, a health care policy expert at Harvard Medical School, described the federal rapid-test program as “a positive step but late in

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