Retail giant Best Buy retailer won’t pay for fridge flood its own contractor caused | 7 On Your Side

ELTINGVILLE, Staten Island (WABC) — When a new fridge flooded and caused thousands of dollars in damage, a young couple says a retail giant turned its back on them.

“To be honest I was so upset, I couldn’t even handle it,” Jason Anello said.

Welcome to Jason and Abby Anello’s newlywed nightmare. Their new home was ruined before he could even carry her over the threshold.

“It’s just been a big headache,” Anello said.

He’s talking about the thousands in water damage due to a faulty fridge installation.

The listing for their Staten Island home caught their eye and features an open floor plan with a big kitchen and hardwood floors. So, they bought it.

“We put a lot of money into the house with renovations,” said Anello.

RELATED | 7 On Your Side: Young car-buyer wrangled into a ripoff

One of the expenses included a fancy new fridge from

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‘We want people to stay in their homes’: Mortgage lenders don’t expect a flood of foreclosures when moratorium ends

At Greenfield Savings Bank, about 20% of mortgage customers are in deferral, said President John H. Howland.

These are people who have told the bank they’ve suffered an economic loss from the coronavirus pandemic.

“It allows people to not make payments,” he said. “It basically goes on the back end of the mortgage.”

But now those deferrals of 30, 60 or 90 days are ending just as the statewide moratorium on mortgage foreclosures is set to end Saturday. A moratorium on residential evictions is also expected to sunset.

All are measures meant to soften the blow and guide households through COVID-19. But even with the moratoriums ending, local mortgage lenders don’t expect a rush of foreclosures to come sweeping through the system, as they did in the 2008-09 recession.

“We don’t know what is going to happen when the deferral period ends and people start payments,” Howland said. “We want

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S.F. homes for sale hit a 15-year-high, as deluge of new condos flood the market

San Francisco’s residential real estate market saw brisk activity from July through September with a steep increase in both sales and inventory, as a significant jump in buyers was not enough to keep up with the deluge of new condos and homes flooding the marketplace, according to a new report from the brokerage Compass.



a person standing in front of a building: San Francisco’s residential real estate market saw brisk activity from July through September with a steep increase in both sales and inventory.


© Gabrielle Lurie / The Chronicle

San Francisco’s residential real estate market saw brisk activity from July through September with a steep increase in both sales and inventory.


The number of sales rose 30.2% compared to the third quarter last year, climbing from 1,151 to 1,499 transactions. But the number of listings is at a 15-year high, with a 10-month inventory for condos in some neighborhoods. Comparing September to the same month last year, the number of price reductions was up 172% for houses and condos combined. Of the price reductions, 80% were of condos.

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S.F. homes for sale hit a 15-year-high, deluge of condos flood the market

San Francisco’s residential real estate market saw brisk activity from July through September with a steep increase in both sales and inventory, as a significant jump in buyers was not enough to keep up with the deluge of new condos and homes flooding the marketplace, according to a new report from the brokerage Compass.



a person standing in front of a building: San Francisco’s residential real estate market saw brisk activity from July through September with a steep increase in both sales and inventory.


© Gabrielle Lurie / The Chronicle

San Francisco’s residential real estate market saw brisk activity from July through September with a steep increase in both sales and inventory.


The number of sales rose 30.2% compared to the third quarter last year, climbing from 1,151 to 1,499 transactions. But the number of listings is at a 15-year high, with a 10-month inventory for condos in some neighborhoods. Comparing September to the same month last year, the number of price reductions was up 172% for houses and condos combined. Of the price reductions, 80% were of condos.

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Turkey, Elm Creek flood prevention plan in works | Grand Island Local News

The third phase is actual construction.

In a best-case scenario, construction would take place in roughly five to six years.

“The first two (phases) would take four years, if you’re successful in getting the second grant funded,” he said. “The last phase would be up to the construction, which, as we know, it can take 20 or 30 years to get that kind of stuff done. Sometimes it happens faster. It just depends on the scale of the projects.”

The grants come at a time when the 2019 floods still are fresh in everyone’s minds.

“They had extensive flooding in Kearney due to Turkey Creek,” Mintken said. “Not that this would alleviate that kind of flooding because that was a record storm. Most of everything we would ever come up with for design, based on feasibility, would be for a 100-year storm with a 1% chance of happening.”

He added,

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New homes for the victims of Karnataka flood 2019 – India

After every unprecedented rain and floods, rehabilitation, reconstruction and care for displaced becomes the biggest challenge in the flood-affected areas.

The Karnataka flood triggered by the torrential rain destroyed thousands of houses with heavy loss of lives, personal belongings, houses, livelihood, etc. Most Rev. (Dr.) Peter Machado, Archbishop of Archdiocese of Bengaluru called a meeting immediately and worked out a strategy to rebuild the lives of the flood-affected families in the districts of Belthangady, Shivamogga, Chikmagalur, Uttara Kannada, Belagavi and Ballari. He also formed a task force committee consisting of lay people, priests and requested them to approach the religious centres, educational institutions, individuals, philanthropists, hospitals, religious congregations, etc., and motivated the public to show their generosity towards flood-affected families.

The Archdiocese has mobilized funds to rebuild the houses in 6 Dioceses of Karnataka and 1 Diocese in Kerala. Based on the severity of the damage, Archdiocese of Bengaluru allotted

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Homes are flooding outside FEMA’s 100-year flood zones, and racial inequality is showing through

When hurricanes and other extreme storms unleash downpours like Tropical Storm Beta has been doing in the South, the floodwater doesn’t always stay within the government’s flood risk zones.



a bridge over a body of water: Cars get stranded on high flood waters on Houston Ave. exit from interstate 45 during Tropical Storm Beta Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020, in Houston.


© Marie D. De Jesús, Houston Chronicle / Staff Photographer

Cars get stranded on high flood waters on Houston Ave. exit from interstate 45 during Tropical Storm Beta Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020, in Houston.


New research suggests that nearly twice as many properties are at risk from a 100-year flood today than the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s flood maps indicate.

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Unfortunately, many of the people living in those properties have no idea that their homes are at risk until the floodwaters rise.

I am a sociologist who works on disaster vulnerability. In a new study, I looked at the makeup of communities in Houston that aren’t in the 100-year flood zone, but that still flood. What I found tells

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Homes are flooding outside FEMA’s 100-year flood zones, and racial inequality is showing through

(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.)

Kevin T. Smiley, Louisiana State University

(THE CONVERSATION) When hurricanes and other extreme storms unleash downpours like Tropical Storm Beta has been doing in the South, the floodwater doesn’t always stay within the government’s flood risk zones.

New research suggests that nearly twice as many properties are at risk from a 100-year flood today than the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s flood maps indicate.

Unfortunately, many of the people living in those properties have no idea that their homes are at risk until the floodwaters rise.

I am a sociologist who works on disaster vulnerability. In a new study, I looked at the makeup of communities in Houston that aren’t in the 100-year flood zone, but that still flood. What I found tells a story of racial disparities in the city. Research in other cities

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