KKR Real Estate Finance Trust Inc. to Announce Third Quarter 2020 Results

KKR Real Estate Finance Trust Inc. (“KREF”) (NYSE: KREF) announced today that it plans to release its financial results for the third quarter 2020 on Monday, October 26, 2020, after the closing of trading on the New York Stock Exchange.

A conference call to discuss KREF’s financial results will be held on Tuesday, October 27, 2020 at 10:00 a.m. ET. The conference call may be accessed by dialing (844) 784-1730 (U.S. callers) or +1 (412) 380-7410 (non-U.S. callers); a pass code is not required. Additionally, the conference call will be broadcast live over the Internet and may be accessed through the Investor Relations section of KREF’s website at http://www.kkrreit.com/investor-relations/events-and-presentations. A slide presentation containing supplemental information may also be accessed through this website in advance of the call.

A replay of the live broadcast will be available on KREF’s website or by dialing (877) 344-7529 (U.S. callers) or +1 (412) 317-0088

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Deutsche Bank, Goldman and JP Morgan top commercial real estate finance, despite COVID-19 cracks


Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Several Wall Street banks have come to dominate a corner of U.S. commercial real estate finance over the past seven months, even as the coronavirus pandemic has cast a long shadow over the market.

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Deutsche Bank (DB) Goldman Sachs (GS) and JP Morgan Chase (JPM) each significantly grew their share of the roughly $550 billion commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBS) market during the pandemic, according to a new report by Deutsche’s research arm.

The CMBS market is a type of property finance where Wall Street banks make loans on hotels, skyscrapers, and other types of commercial buildings to package into bond deals that investors buy.

This chart shows which Wall Street banks won — and lost — market share since the pandemic took hold in the U.S.

Deutsche Bank Research, Index data

Researchers categorized loans as pre-COVID from January to March, but as post-COVID as

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Here are the top finance stories of the day for October 9

Happy Friday!

The big news of the day was Morgan Stanley announcing plans to acquire investment manager Eaton Vance for $7 billion. We’ve got some great analysis on the news, so no point wasting any more time up here!

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James Gorman, the chief executive of Morgan Stanley.

James Gorman, the chief executive of Morgan Stanley.

Joshua Roberts/Reuters


It’s been a big year for Morgan Stanley. 

Less than eight months after announcing plans to acquire discount brokerage E-Trade for $13 billion — and not even a week after closing the deal

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An Interview With RE/MAX’s Finance Chief

The real estate industry has been disrupted in 2020, but not necessarily to its detriment. In a recent Q&A with Karri Callahan, CFO of the global, franchise-based real estate company RE/MAX, I discussed a variety of issues related to her company and industry, as well as broader topics for finance professionals in the 21st century. In the first part of a two-part series, I asked Karri about how Covid-19 has impacted the real estate industry and how she as CFO has addressed new challenges and opportunities. Additionally, I asked her about RE/MAX’s franchise model and how a central finance leader can effectively manage a sprawling network of brokers all over the world while maintaining a strong company culture

Jeff Thomson: The real estate market tends to suffer in an economic downturn. In the Covid-19 downturn, real estate has

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Expect your home remodeling to ‘cost 50% more and take 50% longer,’ says finance expert

So you’re thinking about doing a major home renovation. You’ve been stuck indoors since the pandemic — and you plan to be for a while longer. So why not put some money into making it look nicer?

If you’ve never remodeled your home before, getting through the process can be a complete nightmare. I’ve been through four projects, and none of them were pleasant. But, after the first two, I finally wisened up to the game that some general contractors play to extract as much money from homeowners as possible.

Here’s what I learned from all my painful, exhausting and costly experiences:

1. It will cost more than expected.

Competition is fierce, so a contractor might initially offer an attractive price just to beat out all the other bids. Their goal is to get you to sign the contract. Once you’re locked in, they can upsell you with add-ons.

If

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