‘We want people to stay in their homes’: Mortgage lenders don’t expect a flood of foreclosures when moratorium ends

At Greenfield Savings Bank, about 20% of mortgage customers are in deferral, said President John H. Howland.

These are people who have told the bank they’ve suffered an economic loss from the coronavirus pandemic.

“It allows people to not make payments,” he said. “It basically goes on the back end of the mortgage.”

But now those deferrals of 30, 60 or 90 days are ending just as the statewide moratorium on mortgage foreclosures is set to end Saturday. A moratorium on residential evictions is also expected to sunset.

All are measures meant to soften the blow and guide households through COVID-19. But even with the moratoriums ending, local mortgage lenders don’t expect a rush of foreclosures to come sweeping through the system, as they did in the 2008-09 recession.

“We don’t know what is going to happen when the deferral period ends and people start payments,” Howland said. “We want

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The Tech Solutions Buyers Barely Know They Expect From New Homes

To Wall Street and many home builders, their business is moving units, turning inventory, generating margins of return on invested capital. To a strong, deep, and seemingly enduring stream of buyers, those teeming transactions are something else: home, livability, well-being, a place to prosper.

New home buyers are ante-ing up in droves to solve a three-part life riddle right now. Pandemic, economic, social, and political turmoil continue to wreak unrelenting havoc on the zeitgeist, spread fear, and dim the horizon. The problem buyers are so keen to solve draws off three classic coordinates: Price. Product. Location. Maybe or maybe not in that order. New home builders, as it turns out, do price, product, and location like it’s nobody else’s business. It’s their stock and trade, and they’re doing it at capacity and velocity levels they’ve hardly even tried to achieve in 15 years.

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Expect your home remodeling to ‘cost 50% more and take 50% longer,’ says finance expert

So you’re thinking about doing a major home renovation. You’ve been stuck indoors since the pandemic — and you plan to be for a while longer. So why not put some money into making it look nicer?

If you’ve never remodeled your home before, getting through the process can be a complete nightmare. I’ve been through four projects, and none of them were pleasant. But, after the first two, I finally wisened up to the game that some general contractors play to extract as much money from homeowners as possible.

Here’s what I learned from all my painful, exhausting and costly experiences:

1. It will cost more than expected.

Competition is fierce, so a contractor might initially offer an attractive price just to beat out all the other bids. Their goal is to get you to sign the contract. Once you’re locked in, they can upsell you with add-ons.

If

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