Weston: Beware high-risk homes that drive up insurance

Flood risk is also a concern, Naughton says. Flooding isn’t covered by regular homeowners insurance policies, and typically only homes in the highest-risk zones are required by mortgage lenders to buy special flood policies. But the federal government’s flood maps may understate the risk to many properties, especially as hurricanes get stronger and bring intense rainfall along with larger storm surges.

“We’re seeing coastal flooding that’s going in quite a bit,” Naughton says. “People who previously didn’t consider flood insurance should because of the rain aspect as well as the surges.”

Again, talking to the neighbors and a local insurance agent can help you assess the potential costs. You can get quotes for flood insurance from the National Flood Insurance Program as well as a few private insurers.

EARTH-SHAKING RISKS

The U.S. Geological Survey says 16 states are at high risk for a damaging earthquake in the next half-century: Alaska,

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Liz Weston: Beware high-risk homes that drive up insurance

When house hunting, the price of homeowners insurance probably isn’t top of mind. But homes with hidden risks can make getting coverage difficult, expensive or both. Learning how to identify them could save you a bundle.

This could be a particularly important concern for first-time homebuyers and those moving from cities to suburban or rural areas who may not be aware of common hazards, says Jennifer Naughton, risk consulting officer for North America for Chubb, an insurance company.

Three out of 10 city dwellers told a Chubb survey in early August that they were considering moving out of the city because of the novel coronavirus outbreak. Meanwhile, the number of first-time homebuyers in the first half of 2020 rose 4% compared to a year earlier as lower interest rates made mortgages more affordable, according to Genworth Mortgage Insurance.

WHERE’S THE NEAREST FIRE HYDRANT?

A homeowners insurance premium can depend in

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Beware high-risk homes that drive up insurance

When house hunting, the price of homeowners insurance probably isn’t top of mind. But homes with hidden risks can make getting coverage difficult, expensive or both. Learning how to identify them could save you a bundle.

This could be a particularly important concern for first-time homebuyers and those moving from cities to suburban or rural areas who may not be aware of common hazards, says Jennifer Naughton, risk consulting officer for North America for Chubb, an insurance company.

Three out of 10 city dwellers told a Chubb survey in early August that they were considering moving out of the city because of the novel coronavirus outbreak. Meanwhile, the number of first-time homebuyers in the first half of 2020 rose 4% compared to a year earlier as lower interest rates made mortgages more affordable, according to Genworth Mortgage Insurance.

WHERE’S THE NEAREST FIRE HYDRANT?


A homeowners insurance premium can depend in

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Neighbor stays to help homes from burning on Mountain Hawk Drive in Santa Rosa

One resident of the Skyhawk Community in east Santa Rosa sent his family away Sunday night but vowed to stay and protect his home and those of neighbors.

Jas Sihota, 49, a radiology technician at Kaiser Permanente, worked to help save four neighborhood homes using garden hoses.

“I’m no cowboy, I just didn’t want to lose my house,” he said.

Sihota knew the situation was dire when he saw his maple tree bending from the wind Sunday night. Beyond that, he saw a completely red sky.

He told his family to leave and he remained, as he said he had done in previous evacuations for the Tubbs and Kincade fires.

Seeing embers the size of golf balls, Sihota sprayed the roofs of his house and several others before flames arrived. Later, he said, he saw fences and landscaping catch fire and doused them.

At least a dozen homes were destroyed

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Great Falls Tribune office 38,000 square-foot building on River Drive up for sale

The Great Falls Tribune is listing its 38,000 square-foot building at 205 River Drive for sale.



a building that has a sign on a grassy field: The Great Falls Tribune office building at 205 River Drive is up for sale.


© Great Falls Tribune
The Great Falls Tribune office building at 205 River Drive is up for sale.

A real estate team from Gannett, the Tribune’s parent company, will handle the sale of the building just off the banks of the Missouri River near Broadwater Bay.

The Tribune’s newsroom and circulation staff will continue to be based in Great Falls.

With the shift of the printing operation to the Helena Independent Record, the Tribune will look to move into a leased space in Great Falls that is more accommodating to its current staff.

Stopping the presses: Remembering the rich history of printing Tribune in Great Falls

The Tribune moved into the River Drive location in 1979 after operating for more than 60 years in what is now the Cascade County Treasurer’s office at 2nd

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