Death of the HQ? Pandemic hits commercial real estate, but long-term trends still open to debate

A rendering of one of Amazon’s new buildings in Bellevue, Wash. (Vulcan Image)

“HQ’s are finished.”

That was the hot take this week from Chris Herd, founder and CEO of remote work setup startup Firstbase. After speaking with about 1,000 companies over the past six months, he estimates that many will be cutting their office space by as much as 40% to 60%. About 90% of workforces indicated that they “never want to be in an office again full-time,” he wrote.

The latest example of the trend is the news this morning that working from home will be a permanent part of the mix at Microsoft. Boosting access to talent, reducing costs, and quality of life were among the benefits of remote work cited by companies in Herd’s informal survey.

“Good thread on the future of work. I agree with him,” former Zillow Group CEO Spencer Rascoff chimed in

Read More Read more

Vice-presidential debate: Kamala Harris, Mike Pence debate pandemic, Donald Trump’s taxes and the U.S. economy

Vice-President Mike Pence and his Democratic challenger, California Sen. Kamala Harris, will face off in a vice-presidential debate at 9 p.m. ET in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Susan Page, USA Today’s Washington bureau chief, will moderate.

Harris, Pence and Page will use Plexiglas shields as a COVID-19 precaution, according to the Commission on Presidential Debates. The shields were requested by the Biden-Harris campaign, while Pence’s team initially objected to them.

Pence has spent time in close proximity to President Donald Trump, who is recovering from coronavirus at the White House. Kamala Harris and Mike Pence both have tested negative for COVID-19, according to their teams.

Ultimately, the debate is a chance for voters to decide whether Pence and Harris are ready to step into the presidency at a moment’s notice.

Over the course of 90 minutes, Harris and Pence will debate in nine segments of approximately 10 minutes each.

Read More Read more

Biden campaign had fly swatters for sale in less than two hours after the vice presidential debate, and they’re already sold out

The Biden campaign didn’t miss a beat trying to capitalize on the, um, buzz of the vice presidential debate.



"Truth Over Flies" fly swatter


© “From Team Joe Store”
“Truth Over Flies” fly swatter

Within minutes of the debate wrapping up Wednesday, the Biden campaign tweeted a photo of Joe Biden with a fly swatter and a caption that said, “Pitch in $5 to help this campaign fly.”

In case you missed it: A fly very noticeably landed on Vice President Mike Pence’s stiffly coiffed head as he debated Sen. Kamala Harris. The fly lingered, and the internet couldn’t stop talking about it.

Video: Fly lands on Mike Pence’s head during debate (CNN)

Fly lands on Mike Pence’s head during debate

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

Two hours later, the Biden campaign website was peddling $10 “Truth Over Flies” swatters.

And within a few hours more, a campaign spokesperson said, the nearly 35,000 swatters had

Read More Read more

Trump plans to take part in next presidential debate, spokesman says

WASHINGTON—U.S. President Donald Trump plans to take part in next week’s scheduled presidential debate with his Democratic rival Joe Biden despite his coronavirus diagnosis last week, a spokesman told Fox News late Monday.

“The president intends to debate,” Tim Murtaugh told the broadcaster less than an hour after Trump left the Walter Reed medical center, where he had been receiving treatment for COVID-19.

The second debate, during which the candidates are to answer questions from voters, is set to take place on Oct. 15 in Miami.

There have been concerns that Trump may have been infectious at his first debate with Biden last week, when the pair stood six feet apart. Both men are in their 70s and in the high-risk category of those who become infected with coronavirus because of their age.

Biden has repeatedly tested negative for the virus in recent days and has said he is willing

Read More Read more

State of Texas: TWC contractor reveals call center problems; Senate candidates prepare for debate

AUSTIN (Nexstar) – Imagine showing up to a job where you know that almost 75% of what you do will fail someone. What if a fireman failed to help someone in three out of four fire calls? What if a police officer failed to help clear three out of four 911 calls?

Day, after day.

That’s what a contractor helping field calls for the Texas Workforce Commission told us was going on inside some of the agency’s call centers. The contractor, who asked to not be identified in this report, told KXAN the problem facing nearly every caller is that their call may be answered by people who have no way to help Texans calling for help with their unemployment problems.

This worker said they’re unable to help about three-quarters of the people who call with unemployment problems.

Since the pandemic hit in mid-March, hundreds of unemployed Texans wrote to

Read More Read more

Markets mixed after Trump-Biden debate; data lifts China

Stocks were mixed in Asia on Wednesday while upbeat manufacturing data lifted shares in China as investors studied the outcome of the debate between President Donald Trump and his Democratic challenger, Joe Biden.

Hong Kong and Shanghai led regional gains while Japan’s Nikkei 225 edged lower. Overnight, the S&P 500 lost 0.5% as heavy selling of banks helped reverse some of the gains the market a day earlier.

Investors remain cautious with COVID-19 infections on the rise again in the U.S. and elsewhere. The Trump-Biden debate occurred as coronavirus deaths worldwide have surpassed 1 million. Many millions of people worldwide are jobless.

A survey of Chinese manufacturers, t he Caixin manufacturing purchasing manager’s index, showed economic activity accelerating further in September as businesses recovered from the downturn earlier this year due to the pandemic.

The Caixin manufacturing PMI slipped to 53.0 from 53.1 in August, on a scale of 1-100

Read More Read more

Raucous presidential debate has no lasting impact as North American markets end month

TORONTO – A raucous U.S. presidential debate had little lasting impact on stock markets Wednesday as they ended their worst month since March’s sizable correction.

The early futures in both Canada and the U.S. decreased significantly after Tuesday’s chaotic debate between U.S. President Donald Trump and former vice-president Joe Biden.

But with nothing new presented on policy, investors latched onto hopeful news from Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin about a possible fiscal stimulus deal.

“Once the market sort of digested that early in the morning, we saw a sharp reversal in particular in the U.S. and we saw the TSX go into positive territory as well,” said Giles Marshall, portfolio manager at Fiduciary Trust Canada.

“Mnuchin offered some optimism pretty much at the last minute in terms of being able to get a deal done before the election takes place.”

Markets lost some of the gains in afternoon trading.

While investors

Read More Read more