‘Climate change risk’ may be spurring home buyers to steer clear of coastal Florida markets, study says


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Fewer Americans are scooping up coastal real-estate these days — and the risk of rising sea levels appears to be driving the trend.

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Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania studied the dynamics of coastal real-estate markets in Florida, where as many as one million homes are expected to be at risk of chronic flooding due to rising sea levels by the year 2100. Comparing homes in areas with more exposure to rising sea levels with those that are less at risk, the study found that today’s home buyers have far less interest in the more at-risk properties.

Before 2013, transaction volumes across these two sections of the market moved in tandem. But since then, they have diverged. The number of homes sold in the markets with the highest risk of “chronic inundation,” as some call it, fell between 16% and 20% from 2013 to

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Inside the climate battle quietly raging about US homes | US news

Some challenges to US climate action are obvious – like when Donald Trump boasts about leaving the international Paris agreement and rolling back pollution rules.

But many more play out behind the scenes. One of those is the battle over efforts to make America’s new homes and buildings more energy-efficient.

On one side are the city and state officials trying to go greener, and on the other are real estate developers and the natural gas industry.

The International Code Council, which like the World Series largely concerns Americans, met this week on updating the baseline codes that most states and cities adopt for new buildings. The council is reviewing about two dozen proposals that would, for example, require builders to install electrical outlets near gas stoves that may one day be replaced with electric ones; and to wire enough power to garages where people may one day want to plug

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The climate battle quietly raging this week about US homes

Some challenges to US climate action are obvious – like when Donald Trump boasts about leaving the international Paris agreement and rolling back pollution rules.



a group of people in a garden: Photograph: Justin Lane/EPA


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Photograph: Justin Lane/EPA

But many more play out behind the scenes. One of those is the battle over efforts to make America’s new homes and buildings more energy-efficient.

Related: Carbon capture ‘moonshot’ moves closer, as billions of dollars pour in

On one side are the city and state officials trying to go greener, and on the other are real estate developers and the natural gas industry.

The International Code Council, which like the World Series largely concerns Americans, met this week on updating the baseline codes that most states and cities adopt for new buildings. The council is reviewing about two dozen proposals that would, for example, require builders to install electrical outlets near gas stoves that may one day

Read More Read more

Small homes made of Maine materials could boost economy, aid climate, council says

The Maine Climate Council has suggested a strategy that draws on the potential for constructing fuel efficient, modestly priced homes with locally sourced wood to help address the state’s affordable housing shortage while boosting the economy.



a truck is parked on the side of a building


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Sustainably harvested wood – particularly when transport is minimal – is more sensible when compared with steel and concrete, which have a denser carbon footprint, Stephen Shaler, associate director of the Advanced Structures and Composites Center at the University of Maine, told the Maine Monitor.

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Using locally sourced wood to build homes could expand job opportunities in construction, design and forest products, revitalize former mill towns, help trade school programs and strengthen university research and development, the climate council reported.

While Maine is known for producing traditional hardwood from spruce and pine, engineered wood like laminated strand lumber is a newer industry. Wood fiber

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How To Adjust Your Real Estate Portfolio For Any Economic Climate

Owner of The Mandrell Company. Real estate investor, broker, coach, lecturer and author.

Real estate mogul and world-renowned shark Barbara Corcoran once said, “A funny thing happens in real estate. When it comes back, it comes back up like gangbusters.” There’s no doubt the real estate market is volatile right now, but there are ways to adjust your portfolio, regardless of the economic climate. Before we can discuss strategy, we need to explore real estate economics generally, the differences between a buyer’s market and a seller’s market, and how certain economic climates can affect lending practices.

Market Shifts

A buyer’s market is one where there is more inventory available than there are buyers. The term comes from the buyer having the upper hand in this scenario. For example, there may be five homes available for sale for every one buyer who is looking to purchase in that particular

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