Glass fire 95% contained after burning nearly 800 homes in California’s Napa, Sonoma counties

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — The Glass fire, a destructive wildfire that burned close to 800 homes in California’s North Bay area and forced tens of thousands to evacuate after sparking in extreme wind late last month, is almost fully contained.



a person that is lit up at night: Thomas Lo, a member of a San Jose Fire Strike Team keeps watch from the roof of an outbuilding as a slow burning section of the Glass Fire burns near a home in St. Helena, CA, on Friday, Oct. 2, 2020.


© Anda Chu/San Jose Mercury News/TNS
Thomas Lo, a member of a San Jose Fire Strike Team keeps watch from the roof of an outbuilding as a slow burning section of the Glass Fire burns near a home in St. Helena, CA, on Friday, Oct. 2, 2020.

With temperatures cooler, humidity higher and winds calmer, crews have made great progress in recent days, boosting containment to 95% on the nearly 67,500-acre fire, Cal Fire said in a Monday morning update.



a couple of people that are on fire: A firefighter removes items from a garage as they battle a fire at a home along Tucker Road in Calistoga, CA, on Friday, Oct. 2, 2020. The Glass Fire, already the fifth largest of the 23 major fires burning in the state, has engulfed 58,880 acres in the North Bay and damaged or destroyed nearly 400 buildings.


© Anda Chu/San Jose Mercury News/TNS
A firefighter removes items from a garage as they battle a fire at a home along Tucker Road in Calistoga, CA, on Friday, Oct. 2,

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Glass fire nearly quadruples in size in a day, burning 80 homes in Napa Valley

At least 80 homes have been destroyed in Napa and Sonoma counties as the Glass fire continues to rampage through California’s wine country.



a man with smoke coming out of a car: ST. HELENA, CA - SEPTEMBER 28: The Glass Fire in Napa County burns on a mountainside with the Beckstoffer Vinyards in the foreground on Monday, Sept. 28, 2020 in St. Helena, CA. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times) (Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times)


© Provided by The LA Times
ST. HELENA, CA – SEPTEMBER 28: The Glass Fire in Napa County burns on a mountainside with the Beckstoffer Vinyards in the foreground on Monday, Sept. 28, 2020 in St. Helena, CA. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times) (Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times)

The blaze had burned 42,560 acres as of Tuesday — nearly quadruple its size since Monday morning — and there is still no containment, according to Erick Hernandez, a public information officer with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

So far, Hernandez said, crews had confirmed that the fire destroyed 52 residences in Napa County and 28 others in Sonoma County.

Figures on how many commercial structures had been damaged or destroyed were not available Tuesday

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Neighbor stays to help homes from burning on Mountain Hawk Drive in Santa Rosa

One resident of the Skyhawk Community in east Santa Rosa sent his family away Sunday night but vowed to stay and protect his home and those of neighbors.

Jas Sihota, 49, a radiology technician at Kaiser Permanente, worked to help save four neighborhood homes using garden hoses.

“I’m no cowboy, I just didn’t want to lose my house,” he said.

Sihota knew the situation was dire when he saw his maple tree bending from the wind Sunday night. Beyond that, he saw a completely red sky.

He told his family to leave and he remained, as he said he had done in previous evacuations for the Tubbs and Kincade fires.

Seeing embers the size of golf balls, Sihota sprayed the roofs of his house and several others before flames arrived. Later, he said, he saw fences and landscaping catch fire and doused them.

At least a dozen homes were destroyed

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‘Fire tornado’ hit Huntington Lake, Calif., with some roots still burning

FRESNO, CALIF.—A “fire tornado” scorched the area near Huntington Lake when the Creek Fire initially picked up in intensity last week, according to Huntington Lake Volunteer Fire Department Chief Chris Donnelly.

The large flames and high winds caused many trees to be uprooted in the old meadow area in front of Kennolyn Camps on the north side of Huntington Lake, Donnelly said of the scene he witnessed Sept. 5.

He and others captured the scene in photos and on videos that they hope to share with evacuees in the coming days.

A fire tornado, also sometimes called a fire whirl, occurs when intense heat from a wildfire causes hot air to surge up from the ground and form a whirl or tornadolike vertically oriented rotating column of air, according to UC Santa Barbara’s Department of Geography.

A week later, Donnelly said Saturday that the Creek Fire continues to burn in

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