Inside the climate battle quietly raging about US homes | US news

Some challenges to US climate action are obvious – like when Donald Trump boasts about leaving the international Paris agreement and rolling back pollution rules.

But many more play out behind the scenes. One of those is the battle over efforts to make America’s new homes and buildings more energy-efficient.

On one side are the city and state officials trying to go greener, and on the other are real estate developers and the natural gas industry.

The International Code Council, which like the World Series largely concerns Americans, met this week on updating the baseline codes that most states and cities adopt for new buildings. The council is reviewing about two dozen proposals that would, for example, require builders to install electrical outlets near gas stoves that may one day be replaced with electric ones; and to wire enough power to garages where people may one day want to plug

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The climate battle quietly raging this week about US homes

Some challenges to US climate action are obvious – like when Donald Trump boasts about leaving the international Paris agreement and rolling back pollution rules.



a group of people in a garden: Photograph: Justin Lane/EPA


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Justin Lane/EPA

But many more play out behind the scenes. One of those is the battle over efforts to make America’s new homes and buildings more energy-efficient.

Related: Carbon capture ‘moonshot’ moves closer, as billions of dollars pour in

On one side are the city and state officials trying to go greener, and on the other are real estate developers and the natural gas industry.

The International Code Council, which like the World Series largely concerns Americans, met this week on updating the baseline codes that most states and cities adopt for new buildings. The council is reviewing about two dozen proposals that would, for example, require builders to install electrical outlets near gas stoves that may one day

Read More Read more

Huge T-rex skeleton, almost complete, some battle damage

One of the largest, most complete and most famous Tyrannosaurus rex skeletons is about to go under the hammer. The dinosaur, nicknamed “Stan,” has been on display in the Black Hills Institute for decades, but will now be auctioned off by Christie’s to whoever has a spare few million dollars and a T-rex-sized space on hand.

Named after palaeontologist Stan Sacrison who discovered the first bones in 1987, Stan is a magnificent specimen of one of the most incredible creatures to have ever walked the planet. He stands 13 feet (4 m) high at the hip and stretches 40 feet (12 m) long from snout to tail, and is estimated to have weighed between 7 and 8 tons – putting him not far behind Scotty as one of the largest Tyrannosaurs ever found.

Made up of 188 original bones, Stan is also the fifth-most complete T-rex, behind other celebrities like

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