Black Americans Pay More For Homes Than Any Other Group: Study Finds

A new study from MIT has found that Black Americans pay more for homeownership than any other group.

Black Americans, HomeownershipJoe Raedle / Getty Images

The study, conducted by Edward Golding, executive director of the MIT Golub Center for Finance and Policy, reports that Black Americans pay more for mortgage interest, mortgage insurance, and property taxes than other homeowners.

The disparities are as follows: $743 per year in mortgage interest payments, $550 a year mortgage insurance premiums, and$390 per year in property taxes. All-in-all this accounts for a $67,320 loss in retirement savings for Black homeowners over 30 years.

“The small differences compounding over the life of the mortgage and during homeownership can add up,” writes Golding. “Even if it is a few hundred dollars a year here and there, it can amount to another year’s salary families would otherwise have.”

“While mortgage costs are determined by markets to some extent,” said

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Study Shows Black Americans Are Paying More to Own Homes

In a new study from MIT, it has been reported that Black Americans are often forced to pay more than any other group of individuals to own a home.

CNN reports that Black homeowners on average pay more in mortgage interest, mortgage insurance, and property taxes than other homeowners. Written by Edward Golding, MIT’s executive director of the Golub Center for Finance and Policy, the paper concludes that the vast difference between what Black homeowners and white homeowners pay indicates that it’s considerably more difficult for Black homeowners to accumulate wealth through ownership at the same rate as white homeowners. 

The differences between mortgage payments is $743 per year, mortgage insurance premiums $550 per year, and property taxes at $390 per year. Totaling $13,464 “over the life of the line,” the gap could result in up to $67,320 in lost retirement savings. 

“The small differences compounding over the life of

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Americans Want Homes, but There Have Rarely Been Fewer for Sale

The pandemic has aggravated the housing market’s longstanding lack of supply, creating a historic shortage of homes for sale.

Buyers are accelerating purchase plans or considering homeownership for the first time, rushing to get more living space as many Americans anticipate working from home for a while. Many potential sellers, meanwhile, are keeping their homes off the market for pandemic-related reasons.

The combined effect has created an extreme drought of previously owned homes for sale. At the end of July, there were 1.3 million single-family existing homes for sale, the lowest count for any July in data going back to 1982, according to the National Association of Realtors. In the week ended Sept. 12, total for-sale inventory was down 29.4% from a year earlier at the lowest level since at least late 2017,

Zillow Group Inc.

said.

“Every year we think, ‘We’re hitting new record lows, it can’t get worse,’

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Black Americans are leaving their homes to start their own all-Black communities

This report is part of “Turning Point,” a groundbreaking series by ABC News examining the racial reckoning sweeping the United States and exploring whether it can lead to lasting reconciliation.

For now, the small parcel of land known as Freedom, Georgia, is just a campground on red clay under the hot sun. But for the Black Americans who are moving here, it’s a dream.

So far, about 19 families, most of whom are from Georgia, have pooled their money to buy the nearly 97 acres of land in Wilkinson County, which is located about two hours south of Atlanta. It’s their escape, they said, from the everyday racism that feels like a part of life in the United States.

PHOTO: About 19 families, most of whom are from Georgia, have pooled their money to buy the nearly 97 acres of land in Wilkinson County, which is located about two hours south of Atlanta to establish Freedom, Georgia.

About 19 families, most of whom are from Georgia, have pooled their money to buy the nearly 97 acres of land in Wilkinson County, which is located about two hours south

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More Americans sign contracts to buy homes in August

SILVER SPRING, Md. — More Americans signed contracts to buy homes in August, suggesting the hot U.S. housing market will continue to churn well into fall.

The National Association of Realtors said Wednesday that its index of pending sales rose 8.8% to a record high of 132.8. An index of 100 represents the level of contract activity in 2001. It had sunk to a low of 69 in April, when buyers and sellers were sidelined as the coronavirus swept through the U.S.

US HOUSEHOLD WEALTH HITS RECORD DESPITE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC

Contract signings are a barometer of finalized purchases over the next two months, so this month’s numbers point to continued strong sales into October.

The housing market has been one of the highlights of the U.S. economy, which is still trying to get back

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More Americans Sign Contracts to Buy Homes in August | Business News

By MATT OTT, AP Business Writer

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — More Americans signed contracts to buy homes in August, suggesting the hot U.S. housing market will continue to churn well into fall.

The National Association of Realtors said Wednesday that its index of pending sales rose 8.8% to a record high of 132.8. An index of 100 represents the level of contract activity in 2001. It had sunk to a low of 69 in April, when buyers and sellers were sidelined as the coronavirus swept through the U.S.

Contract signings are a barometer of finalized purchases over the next two months, so this month’s numbers point to continued strong sales into October.

The housing market has been one of the highlights of the U.S. economy, which is still trying to get back its pre-virus momentum. Contract signings are now 24.2% ahead of where they were last year, after falling

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