Rite Aid buys 130-year-old Seattle-based Bartell Drugs chain for $95 million

Bartell Drugs cited the rising costs of the coronavirus pandemic and Seattle business taxes as factors for the sale to Rite Aid.

SEATTLE — It’s the end of an era for one of Puget Sound’s longest running, homegrown companies.

The 130-year-old Bartell Drugs has been sold to Pennsylvania-based Rite Aid for $95 million in a deal that the two companies say will preserve the financial standing and brand name for the locally iconic drugstore chain.

Bartell Drugs’ history dates back to 1890 when George Bartell Sr. opened up his first pharmacy in Seattle’s Central District. It has expanded to 69 stores in King, Pierce and Snohomish counties. 

Rite Aid, which has been a competitor in and out of the market, is a Fortune 500 company based outside Harrisburg, Penn. with more than 2,500 stores in 19 states. 

The “definitive agreement,” as both companies called it, is expected to close in

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Georgia steers virus aid to care homes as rapid tests arrive

ATLANTA (AP) — Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp announced Friday that $113 million in federal coronavirus relief funds will be made available to nursing homes and long-term care facilities.

The funding will be used to bolster staffing and staff testing in facilities across the state, according to news release from Kemp’s office.

Georgia received approximately $4.1 billion in federal funding as part of the CARES Act, passed by Congress in March to provide economic assistance to address the pandemic. The state had approximately $2.1 billion of that left before Friday’s announcement, Kemp spokesman Cody Hall said. Funding can be used to cover costs incurred up until Dec. 30.

Residents of nursing homes and long-term care facilities have been hit particularly hard by the pandemic.

As of Thursday, over 2,530 residents of nursing homes and long-term care facilities with 25 beds or more had died after contracting the coronavirus, according to

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Small homes made of Maine materials could boost economy, aid climate, council says

The Maine Climate Council has suggested a strategy that draws on the potential for constructing fuel efficient, modestly priced homes with locally sourced wood to help address the state’s affordable housing shortage while boosting the economy.



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Sustainably harvested wood – particularly when transport is minimal – is more sensible when compared with steel and concrete, which have a denser carbon footprint, Stephen Shaler, associate director of the Advanced Structures and Composites Center at the University of Maine, told the Maine Monitor.

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Using locally sourced wood to build homes could expand job opportunities in construction, design and forest products, revitalize former mill towns, help trade school programs and strengthen university research and development, the climate council reported.

While Maine is known for producing traditional hardwood from spruce and pine, engineered wood like laminated strand lumber is a newer industry. Wood fiber

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