Why hire a contractor if subcontractors do all the work?

Good contractors can bring piece of mind, knowledge of industry standards and project management expertise. But they also bring tangible, necessary things to the job: a license, insurance and worker’s compensation. If you act as the general contractor yourself, you assume liability for injuries and property damage.

Perhaps the most stress relief comes from the fact that the general contractor is responsible for the quality of all the work he or she oversees as part of the contract. If something goes wrong during the construction, it’s up to the general contractor to get it fixed. The cost of those repairs comes o­ut of the contract budget, not your pocket.

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Knowledge of building codes, appropriate materials, proper construction methods and safety — both during and after construction — also is a key resource that a general contractor brings to your project. This knowledge saves you the time and trouble of

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Private military company – Wikipedia

company providing armed combat or security services

A private military company (PMC) is a private company providing armed combat or security services for financial gain. PMCs refer to their staff as “security contractors” or “private military contractors”. Private military companies refer to their business generally as the “private military industry” or “The Circuit”.[1]

The services and expertise offered by PMCs are typically similar to those of governmental security, military or police forces, most often on a smaller scale. While PMCs often provide services to train or supplement official armed forces in service of governments, they can also be employed by private companies to provide bodyguards for key staff or protection of company premises, especially in hostile territories. However, contractors who use offensive force in a war zone could be considered unlawful combatants, in reference to a concept outlined in the Geneva Conventions and explicitly specified by the

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State of Oregon: Contractor tools

When written contracts are required

  • All contracts on a residential structure that exceed $2,000 must be written. 
  • If the original contract price is less than $2,000 but the price goes up during the project and eventually exceeds $2,000,  you must provide the owner a written contract within five days. (ORS 701.305) 
  • If you do not have a written contract as required, you cannot claim a lien. (ORS 87.037) 

Put all contracts in writing 

A well-written contract helps avoid homeowner complaints. It protects both you and the consumer by specifying what has been agreed to. 

Required terms

If you work on residential properties, you must include the following in your written contract: 

  • Your name, address, phone number, and CCB license number (as shown on CCB records)
  • The customer’s name and address where the work will be performed
  • A description of the work to be performed, the
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