Two Burlington shelters find new homes with more space

Burlington’s North Beach campground, shown here, was used to house homeless people in campers, and then tents. Now, it appears more permanent options are coming to Burlington. Photo by Jim Welch/VTDigger

BURLINGTON — Since March, the Burlington homeless shelter ANEW Place has been on the move. When the pandemic forced residents and staff out of its downtown location, the shelter offered housing in RVs at North Beach, and then, three months later, moved guests to tents at the beach campground.

Now, ANEW Place may finally get a permanent home.

An emergency resolution passed by the City Council on Monday night will allow ANEW Place to buy and move into what is now the Champlain Inn near the rotary on Shelburne Road. The shelter is just waiting for final approval on funding from the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board — which ANEW Place director Kevin Pounds says he is “really hopeful”

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Bay Area office sublease space soars, firms retrench

SAN JOSE — The amount of office space available for sublease space has risen in the Bay Area — and has more than tripled in San -Francisco — an indication that work-from-home protocols amid the coronavirus may have prodded companies to rethink space needs.

Santa Clara County, the East Bay, and San Mateo County have all shown significant increases in sublease space, but San Francisco has earned the dubious distinction of suffering the largest increase by far in the Bay Area for the amount of space available for sublease, according to a new report from Cushman & Wakefield, a commercial real estate firm.

Significant increases in available sublease office space are a nationwide phenomenon but the difficulties are especially acute in the Bay Area, the Cushman & Wakefield report shows.

“The increase in sublease vacancy has been widespread, though one region has been hit the hardest: the San Francisco Bay

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Apartments With Privacy, Home Offices And Outdoor Space Command Higher Prices In New York City

After largely spending the last several months at home, New Yorkers who are still in the real estate market have certainly had time to narrow down their priorities. And they are prioritizing privacy and home offices as much as outdoor space, a new report shows. 

The report from real estate market data firm UrbanDigs, commissioned by Forbes, shows that homes in New York that were described in listings using words and phrases such as “privacy,” or that had home office or outdoor space, saw much less price flexibility, and also saw much higher median sale prices.

For example, the median sale price of units with listings that include the word “privacy” nearly doubled, from $1.58 million in April 2019

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