Air Force to pay $25 million after accidentally killing contractor in F-16 strafing run

An F-16 Viper assigned to the 311th Fighter Squadron, takes off from Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico, July 27, 2020

The U.S. government will pay $24.6 million to the widow of an Air Force contractor who was killed after an F-16 accidentally strafed his position with 20mm rounds, court records show.

Retired Master Sgt. Charles “Chuck” Holbrook, a former Tactical Air Control Party airman turned defense contractor, was killed during a nighttime live-fire training exercise at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico on January 31, 2017.

Holbrook was killed “when an F-16 student pilot mistook the line of rental cars for the similarly aligned target and was ordered to fire at the group, blowing up one of the rental cars and striking Holbrook in the head with a 20mm round,” according to court documents. 

Holbrook died several hours later at

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Air Force Settles $25 Million Lawsuit for F-16 Strafing Run That Killed Contractor

Editor’s Note: Randi McGinn, the family’s lawyer, told Military.com on Friday that the family has settled for an undisclosed amount less than $25 million. “$25 million was the initial demand, but the case was never settled for what the demand was,” McGinn said in a phone call, but would not disclose the new amount, citing family privacy. “They have enough to take care of them for the rest of their lives,” she added. The article and headline have been updated to reflect this new reporting.

A district judge ruled this week ruled that the U.S. Air Force was responsible for the death of a U.S. contractor accidentally killed during a live-fire training exercise.

Charles Holbrook, a retired master sergeant and former Tactical Air Control Party airman, died Jan. 31, 2017, at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, after an F-16 Fighting Falcon student pilot incorrectly identified the target location during

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LGI Homes (LGIH) Hits 52-Week High, Can the Run Continue?

Shares of LGI Homes (LGIH) have been strong performers lately, with the stock up 9.9% over the past month. The stock hit a new 52-week high of $127.59 in the previous session. LGI Homes has gained 78.6% since the start of the year compared to the -16.5% move for the Zacks Finance sector and the -17.7% return for the Zacks Real Estate – Development industry.

What’s Driving the Outperformance?

The stock has an impressive record of positive earnings surprises, as it hasn’t missed our earnings consensus estimate in any of the last four quarters. In its last earnings report on August 4, 2020, LGI Homes reported EPS of $2.21 versus consensus estimate of $1.49 while it beat the consensus revenue estimate by 4.3%.

For the current fiscal year, LGI Homes is expected to post earnings of $9.16 per share on $2.12 billion in revenues. This represents a 30.63% change in

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So many homes are selling that we could run out of new houses in months



a house with a mountain in the background: A house is the most desirable get amid the coronavirus pandemic, but the US is barreling toward an inventory shortage and affordability crisis that'll make homeownership unattainable. John M Lund/Getty Images


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A house is the most desirable get amid the coronavirus pandemic, but the US is barreling toward an inventory shortage and affordability crisis that’ll make homeownership unattainable. John M Lund/Getty Images

  • The hottest pandemic purchase is a house, as more and more Americans take advantage of low mortgage rates to attain spacious backyards and more comfortable work-from-home locales.
  • Existing home sales, which have trended upward for the last 3 months since the housing market reopened from shutdown, soared to a 14-year high in August. New home sales are also up.
  • Home prices are soaring, too, recording the highest two-month appreciation between May and July — at 2% — in 30 years of record-keeping.
  • But not enough new houses are being built to keep up with demand, a trend that actually goes back a decade.
  • Homebuying, in all its trendy glory, only projects to get more
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How 2020 broke the housing market, inventory could actually run out

  • The hottest pandemic purchase is a house, as more and more Americans take advantage of low mortgage rates to attain spacious backyards and more comfortable work-from-home locales.
  • Existing home sales, which have trended upward for the last 3 months since the housing market reopened from shutdown, soared to a 14-year high in August. New home sales are also up.
  • Home prices are soaring, too, recording the highest two-month appreciation between May and July — at 2% — in 30 years of record-keeping.
  • But not enough new houses are being built to keep up with demand, a trend that actually goes back a decade.
  • Homebuying, in all its trendy glory, only projects to get more expensive, if not impossible. If homes keep selling at this rate, Bloomberg estimates the inventory of new homes could actually run out in just a few months.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

 

Have you

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Sold! Twin Cities homebuyers spur run on Duluth homes



a person sitting in a living room with a fireplace: Susan Dusek, a real estate agent for Edina Realty, posed for a portrait in the living room of a Tudor house for sale in the heart of the Congdon Park neighborhood in Duluth. More buyers than ever are relocating from the Twin Cities and other metro areas to Duluth as work-from-home options become permanent and the appeal of the outdoors lures younger buyers.


© Star Tribune/Star Tribune/ALEX KORMANN alex.kormann@startribune.com/Star Tribune/TNS
Susan Dusek, a real estate agent for Edina Realty, posed for a portrait in the living room of a Tudor house for sale in the heart of the Congdon Park neighborhood in Duluth. More buyers than ever are relocating from the Twin Cities and other metro areas to Duluth as work-from-home options become permanent and the appeal of the outdoors lures younger buyers.

DULUTH – It was a busy Saturday for Mike and Chelsea Brandon, who had driven up from Eagan to find their next home.

After a blitz of seven viewings, the couple put in an offer on a charmer that checked all their boxes: two-car garage, a deck, and room for their two-year-old, Lochlann, to play.

“We just live outside, and that’s how we want to raise our son,” Chelsea said.

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“We like camping, the outdoors, the geography of

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Sold! Twin Cities homebuyers spurring a run on homes in Duluth

DULUTH – It was a busy Saturday for Mike and Chelsea Brandon, who had driven up from Eagan to find their next home.

After a blitz of seven viewings, the couple put in an offer on a charmer that checked all their boxes: two-car garage, a deck, and room for their 2-year-old, Lochlann, to play.

“We just live outside, and that’s how we want to raise our son,” Chelsea said.

“We like camping, the outdoors, the geography of the North Shore here,” Mike added. “Just getting out of the Cities.”

They’ll be back again this weekend — not to move in, but to keep looking.

“We competed with three other offers, and the winning offer went in with no inspection,” said their agent, Susan Dusek with Edina Realty. “And their house sold this weekend, so they will come up very ready to buy.”

More buyers from the Twin Cities and

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Bow Tie Cinemas has put its Movieland at Boulevard Square property up for sale; owner plans to continue to run theater complex | Business News

The Movieland complex reopened on July 1. Attendance has been growing since, Masher said.

The family-owned Bow Tie has retained commercial real estate brokerage CBRE as an adviser in the sale or redevelopment of the property. Andrew Ferguson and Eric Williford are listed as the brokers.

“The property and neighborhood are benefited by the central location fronting Arthur Ashe Boulevard and encompassing Bow Tie Cinemas’ Movieland, with immediate access to major interstates, apartments, breweries, restaurants, entertainment venues, grocery stores and high-profile corporate office users,” according to CBRE’s promotional flyer on the property.

The flyer promoting the sale of the property does not list an asking price.

The 16.93-acre property is divided into two parcels.

The 11.05 acres is used for the Movieland and Criterion Cinemas buildings and the parking lots. That parcel is assessed at $18.098 million, according to the city’s online real estate data.

It is owned by BTP

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