Montana’s care homes struggle with staffing and ever-changing regulations as COVID-19 cases rise | State & Regional

During the first three months of the pandemic, Coe kept a bed in his office because he didn’t want to infect his family and wanted to reassure his staff he was there for them.

“Health care and our industry didn’t bring this to the state, but we’re living with choices everybody makes whether you gown up, mask up, you wash your hands — whatever happens, if it gets into the facility, we have to live with whatever happens,” Coe said.

‘Staff doesn’t grow on trees’

The Montana Health Care Association serves long-term care facilities in the state, and many have reached out to get answers and support, according to Rose Hughes, the association’s executive director.

“To me it has just brought forth a whole new experience and lots of questions about how should these things be handled,” Hughes said in an interview in September. “What can you do? Because staff

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Relaxed regulations have calming effect on Cy-Fair area nursing homes

After a heart-breaking five months of isolation, seniors in area nursing homes and assisted living centers have some new options for seeing their loved ones.

At a press conference on Sept. 17, Gov. Greg Abbott announced a new visitation guidance for eligible nursing homes, assisted living facilities, intermediate care facilities, home and community-based service providers, and inpatient hospice effective Thursday, Sept. 24.

“I certainly applaud Gov. Abbott and the HHSC (Health and Human Services Commission) on working to reduce and relieve some of the restrictions with visitation,” said Derek Prince, CEO HMG Healthcare who manages Park Manor of CyFair.


“We value the psycho and social well-being and family relationships,” he said. “It’s been extremely trying for our patient population and our families. We’re excited to be able to put this stuff together,” he said.

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EU Court Backs Paris Regulations on Airbnb Rentals

The European Union’s top court backed a Parisian measure that regulates renting second homes on Airbnb. (iStock)

The European Union’s top court backed a Parisian measure that regulates renting second homes on Airbnb. (iStock)

The European Union’s top court ruled against two Parisian Airbnb hosts in a decision that could impact the short-term rental business’s operations throughout the continent.

The Court of Justice of the European Union ruled in favor of a Paris measure that requires property owners to get city approval to rent a second home on Airbnb, Reuters reported.

Parisian officials had fined two apartment owners for failing to secure those approvals. Airbnb was not a party to the case.
The issue went to a French court, which requested guidance on the issue. The CJEU said the measure was consistent with EU law and justified because it was “proportionate, limited in material and geographical scope, and doesn’t cover the rental of primary homes,” according to Reuters.

“Combating the long-term rental housing shortage constitutes an overriding

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