Why Buying a Home Is a Smart Investment for Millennials

Millennials are swarmed with investing advice – start saving early, take advantage of your employer’s 401(k) match and for heaven’s sake, dump those high-interest credit cards! But for many who are looking to build a retirement nest egg, financial advisors say purchasing a home is one of the best investments millennials can make.

“Buying a home is one of the smartest financial decisions you can make as early as your 20s,” says Riccardo Ravasini, managing director of Rava Realty, who handles properties in New York and Florida, “because it is inflation-protected and a physical asset that doesn’t disappear like stocks can do.”

Nationwide, millennials have been reluctant to buy homes for various reasons, including a volatile job market, high student debt and the delaying of life events, such as marriage. The rate of homeownership for millennials dipped to a low of 36.2 percent in 2014, according to U.S. Census data,

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A Step-By-Step Look at Buying a Home

How you progress through a home buying transaction can vary somewhat depending on the real estate laws and customs where you live, but many steps are standard. You’ll feel more confident about your home-buying journey when you understand the chain of events and what’s required of you, as well as every other person who’s involved in the transaction.

Get Your Finances in Order

Your credit reports are an ongoing record of how you’ve managed your finances. You should know exactly what they say about your financial history before you apply for a mortgage. These reports and your credit score play an important role in the loan approval process, and they also determine your interest rate and other loan terms that lenders will offer you.

You might be surprised by what you find when you look at your credit reports because errors are not uncommon. You might also have

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‘Climate change risk’ may be spurring home buyers to steer clear of coastal Florida markets, study says


Brian Blanco/Getty Images

Fewer Americans are scooping up coastal real-estate these days — and the risk of rising sea levels appears to be driving the trend.

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Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania studied the dynamics of coastal real-estate markets in Florida, where as many as one million homes are expected to be at risk of chronic flooding due to rising sea levels by the year 2100. Comparing homes in areas with more exposure to rising sea levels with those that are less at risk, the study found that today’s home buyers have far less interest in the more at-risk properties.

Before 2013, transaction volumes across these two sections of the market moved in tandem. But since then, they have diverged. The number of homes sold in the markets with the highest risk of “chronic inundation,” as some call it, fell between 16% and 20% from 2013 to

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Couple says they faced discrimination in home appraisal because of wife’s race

This report is part of “Turning Point,” a groundbreaking series by ABC News examining the racial reckoning sweeping the United States and exploring whether it can lead to lasting reconciliation.



a person standing in front of a building: Abena and Alex Horton requested an appraisal of their Jacksonville, Florida, home.


© ABC News
Abena and Alex Horton requested an appraisal of their Jacksonville, Florida, home.

Abena Horton and her husband, Alex Horton, recently did what many homeowners do every day: They requested an appraisal to refinance their Jacksonville, Florida, home.

On the day of the appointment, Abena Horton was there to greet the appraiser who would go over their family’s four-bedroom, four-bathroom ranch style home.

But when the Hortons got the appraisal back, they thought the price was shockingly low.

“It clicked in my mind almost immediately that I understand what the issue was here,” Abena Horton said.

Watch the full story on “Nightline” tonight at 12 a.m. ET on ABC

Abena Horton, an attorney, is Black. Her husband,

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Shure’s SRH1540 headphones can upgrade your home setup with quality sound and all-day comfort

We’re going checking out a range of different headphones on TC this week and next as part of our ‘Headphone Week’ series, and today I’m checking out the Shure SRH1540 ($499). These aren’t new – they’ve been a stand-by among audiophiles in their price range for years now. But there’s a great reason for that: They offer fantastic sound quality and value, as well as amazing comfort and wearability.

The basics

The SRH1540 from Shure are closed-back headphones that provide premium sound suitable either just for people who really like high-quality audio, or for those who actually have to work with audio on a regular basis, including sound engineers and podcast producers. They manage to produce a soundstage that’s very comparable to what you get out of open-back headphones, albeit with less noise leakage (great for shared work-from-home offices).

In the box, Shure includes not one but two cables, as

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New Home Prices in July Out Pace 2019

Home prices in newly built communities are outpacing pricing trends from 2019. According to data from Zonda, 56% of new home communities raised prices in July, while only 39% of new home communities increased pricing in July 2019. Phoenix, Denver, Las Vegas, Sacramento and Riverside are epicenters for new home construction an increased pricing.

“The price increases, especially in the new home market come from the puzzle that the industry was facing pre-pandemic, which is that there are no homes for sale. That has only gotten worse during the pandemic,” Ali Wolf, chief economist at Zonda, tells GlobeSt.com. “If a buyer is looking to take advantage of rates today, there are very few options, especially if they are selective about location.”

The pandemic has actually helped to fuel home sales. It has given many people flexibility to move further away from their jobs, but the pandemic has also

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Shenzhen’s unaffordable home prices could hurt Beijing’s plan to turn the Greater Bay Area tech hub into model city



a view of a city: Shenzhen has been granted autonomy by Beijing on a wide range of local policies, from land use to hiring global talent. Photo: Xinhua


Shenzhen has been granted autonomy by Beijing on a wide range of local policies, from land use to hiring global talent. Photo: Xinhua

Beijing’s blueprint to develop Shenzhen and showcase it a centrepiece of its economic reform and attract talent could hit a major stumbling block in the form of unaffordable housing prices, say analysts.

As part of a five-year plan to build the city into a “core engine” of reform by 2025, Shenzhen has been granted greater autonomy in using rural land for development purposes. The move, which will ease land supply crunch, is aimed at reining in escalating home prices and making the city more affordable to live. It was speculated that Beijing would give Shenzhen “additional land” by allowing it to absorb some neighbouring towns into its territory, but the central government did not do so.

“Home prices take up a major chunk of the cost of

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Top workplaces 2020: Work-life balance while working from home

Linda Miller has found a happy medium.

She lives in Warrenton, Va., which puts her right in between her job as an executive assistant at the economic consulting firm Bates White in Northwest Washington and her 86-year-old parents’ home in Harrisonburg, Va. Before the novel coronavirus forced many workers out of the office, Miller would drive to Harrisonburg once or twice a month and arrive at her parents’ by 8 a.m. to start working remotely. There were days when Miller would stop working at 9 p.m. or midnight if she started later, but her superiors never seemed to mind.

“I feel like I can be just as responsive [working remotely],” Miller said. “I would log into the Bates White computer system while standing at my mom’s kitchen counter and answer emails or work on a project while cooking my dad breakfast, looking over their monthly bills or answering one of

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San Antonio-area home sales and prices skyrocket as inventory tightens

Home sales and prices in the San Antonio area soared in September amid pent-up demand, low interest rates and a tight supply of available homes.

Buyers in Bexar and surrounding counties closed on 3,623 homes last month, up about 32 percent from September 2019, the San Antonio Board of Realtors reported Tuesday. Sales year-to-date are up about 8 percent compared with the same period in 2019.

The median price rose about 11 percent to $261,200.

“The significant growth in sales compared to last year shows the housing sector as a possible factor to move the economy forward,” said Kim Bragman, SABOR’s 2020 board chairman. “We are hopeful to see a positive growth of sales for the remainder of the year.”

On ExpressNews.com: Skyline: More details about plans for $560 million mixed-use development near Pearl

Around 68 percent of the homes sold in September were priced between $200,000 and $499,999, compared

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Australian Home Prices May Rebound on Low Rates, Easy Credit

(Bloomberg) — Australian home prices may have bottomed out and could be set to rise through the end of the year on the back of lower interest rates and easier credit, according to Bloomberg Intelligence.



a house with trees in the background: Residential properties stand along a street in Brisbane, Australia, on Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Australian central bank chief Philip Lowe dashed expectations of an interest-rate cut, looking through recent weakness in inflation to hitch the policy outlook to a labor market that he says remains strong.


© Bloomberg
Residential properties stand along a street in Brisbane, Australia, on Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Australian central bank chief Philip Lowe dashed expectations of an interest-rate cut, looking through recent weakness in inflation to hitch the policy outlook to a labor market that he says remains strong.

Property prices have fallen just 3% since the Covid-19 crisis began, defying concern of a steeper slide. A plan to ease responsible-lending rules and mounting speculation for further loosening of monetary policy in coming months may unleash a wave of borrowing, Bloomberg Intelligence analyst Mohsen Crofts said in a report Wednesday.

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What Bloomberg Intelligence says:

Home prices may have reached a near-term bottom in most

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