Homes for Heroes veterans housing development in Edmonton receives provincial funding boost



a large green field with trees in the background: The site of a Homes for Heroes tiny home development in Edmonton's Evansdale neighbourhood. The 20-unit housing project will provide homes to veterans facing homelessness.


© Cam Cook, Global News
The site of a Homes for Heroes tiny home development in Edmonton’s Evansdale neighbourhood. The 20-unit housing project will provide homes to veterans facing homelessness.

Premier Jason Kenney announced $1.1 million in provincial funding Friday for a housing development in Edmonton for veterans who are experiencing homelessness.

The funding will go toward the Homes for Heroes Foundation, which was developed three years ago in response to the growing number of military veterans who return to civilian life and find themselves without stable housing.

Earlier this year, the foundation was given the green light to build a tiny home development in the area of 94A Street between 153 and 152A avenues.

“Some who face combat or violence and trauma in far off places come back and find it difficult to adjust to civilian life,” Kenney said. “And sometimes that means some of our veterans find themselves

Read More Read more

Public funding for political parties makes sense

Doug Ford resurrected unseemly political fundraising. Let’s hope COVID-19 kills it for good, Cohn, Sept. 23

Star columnist Martin Regg Cohn has outlined a very real problem with the funding model for our political parties. His statement that “public funding is an idea whose time has come” should be a rallying cry for improving our democracy and a path to avoiding the dark money that so distorts the U.S. elections.

However, simply keeping the “per vote” public subsidy should not be the goal.

An analogy for this would be where the strongest team in the NHL is awarded the top draft pick. Essentially that is what the “per vote” subsidy accomplishes: more money and thus more influence to the strongest parties. Rather, we need a model where the ideas and platform of the less popular parties are given equal opportunity to reach the voting public: funding should not only be

Read More Read more

Big Santa Clara housing complex and working farm get key funding

SANTA CLARA — A unique mixed-use project of affordable homes and a working farm proposed for Santa Clara has landed key financing from a state bond, clearing the way for a construction start next year, the developers said.

Agrihood, which will consist of 361 homes and an urban farm across the street from the Westfield Valley Fair mall, has obtained $50 million in tax-exempt bonds from the California Debt Limit Allocation Committee, Core Cos., the developer of the Santa Clara project, said.

“Our success in securing bond financing reflects the importance of the Agrihood in providing stable, sustainable housing,” said Vince Cantore, a vice president of development with Core Cos.

The 361 new homes in Agrihood will include 181 that will be offered at below-market rates. Of the 181 affordable homes, 165 will be set aside for low-income seniors.

Along with the housing, Agrihood will also offer an urban farm,

Read More Read more