Couple says they faced discrimination in home appraisal because of wife’s race

This report is part of “Turning Point,” a groundbreaking series by ABC News examining the racial reckoning sweeping the United States and exploring whether it can lead to lasting reconciliation.



a person standing in front of a building: Abena and Alex Horton requested an appraisal of their Jacksonville, Florida, home.


© ABC News
Abena and Alex Horton requested an appraisal of their Jacksonville, Florida, home.

Abena Horton and her husband, Alex Horton, recently did what many homeowners do every day: They requested an appraisal to refinance their Jacksonville, Florida, home.

On the day of the appointment, Abena Horton was there to greet the appraiser who would go over their family’s four-bedroom, four-bathroom ranch style home.

But when the Hortons got the appraisal back, they thought the price was shockingly low.

“It clicked in my mind almost immediately that I understand what the issue was here,” Abena Horton said.

Watch the full story on “Nightline” tonight at 12 a.m. ET on ABC

Abena Horton, an attorney, is Black. Her husband,

Read More Read more

Google Contractor Alleges Disability Discrimination In Mass Email

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Motherboard: A contractor who works on Google’s G Suite for Higher Education/Google For Education team alleged Google discriminated and retaliated against her after she suffered a knee injury in 2019 by removing her from team meetings, in a complaint reviewed by Motherboard that was filed with the New York State Division of Human Rights on Wednesday. In a mass email sent on Wednesday to Google CEO Sundar Pichai and thousands of Google employees, a sales development representative for the vendor Vaco who works in Google’s New York City office, wrote that in 2019 Google requested her employer Vaco place her on a continuous performance improvement plan for failing to attend meetings without prior warnings, write-ups, or documentation of the meetings she missed. She claims she never missed meetings with notifying her team beforehand.

According to the contractor’s complaint filed with the New York

Read More Read more

Spotlight Team probe: Potential Medicaid discrimination at Massachusetts nursing homes

The replies etched a clear pattern. Nursing homes were more than twice as likely to say they had no room when responding to inquiries from families saying they planned to pay for care with Medicaid — the government health program relied on by low-income residents — rather than paying privately.

Often the difference wasn’t subtle. In some cases, employees from the same facility would tell the daughter of a purported Medicaid applicant that there was a waiting list, while telling the daughter of a private payer, who could be expected to pay the nursing home nearly twice as much, she would be happy to discuss the options.

Discrimination against applicants covered by Medicaid has existed for years in the nursing home industry, say advocates for the elderly, and it can be illegal.

Massachusetts adopted explicit protections in 1994, barring nursing homes from discriminating against “any Medicaid recipient or person eligible

Read More Read more