Nearly three times more COVID deaths in Mississippi’s for-profit nursing homes, analysis shows | State Government

Twice as many residents caught COVID-19 at Mississippi’s for-profit nursing homes, and nearly three times more died there, an analysis of health data by the Mississippi Center for Investigative Reporting shows.

The average number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in these for-profit homes? Four in 10 residents.

One possible factor: 80% of Mississippi’s nursing homes had already been cited for infection-control problems before the pandemic hit.

Charlene Harrington, a professor emeritus at the University of California at San Francisco who discovered similar results in a just-released study of nursing homes in California, said the current pandemic is exposing problems that have persisted for decades. “We’ve just looked the other way for 30 years,” she said.

OSHA has been investigating three nursing homes in Mississippi, all of them for-profit, for workplace catastrophes or fatalities, including Lakeside Health & Rehabilitation Center in Quitman. One of the home’s nursing assistants, Carole Faye Doby of

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County reports new coronavirus deaths at nursing homes for first time in 3 weeks

For the first time in three weeks, San Diego County reported new coronavirus deaths among residents and health care workers at skilled nursing facilities.

As of Wednesday, there have been 173 deaths from COVID-19 among nursing home staff and residents combined, up from 168 reported during the last two weeks. San Diego County reported 1,139 cases of novel coronavirus among nursing home residents and 729 cases among health care workers Wednesday, up from 1,103 and 717 last week.

One new outbreak in skilled nursing homes was reported by the county this week, bringing the total to 84 over the course of the pandemic. There are 20 nursing home outbreaks that are still deemed active, down from the 21 active ones reported last week.

Unlike community outbreaks that are defined as three or more linked cases from separate households, outbreaks in nursing homes only need one case among either residents or

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Iowa agency keeps secret the number of COVID-19 staff deaths in nursing homes

Clark Kauffman, Iowa wCapital Dispatch
Published 2:29 p.m. CT Oct. 5, 2020

The Iowa Department of Public Health is refusing to disclose the number of Iowa nursing home workers who have been infected with, or died from, COVID-19.

For months, the department has released only combined staff-and-resident numbers for both infections and deaths in Iowa nursing homes.

The agency has refused requests to separate the number of staff deaths and infections from the number of resident deaths and infections.

The department’s COVID-19 Communications and Emergency Preparedness Planner Alex Carfrae told the Iowa Capital Dispatch Thursday the agency would not provide requested information on staff deaths “due to privacy concerns.”

After being asked to cite the specific law that allows the agency to withhold non-identifying statistical information of that sort, an agency official said the department intends to review its policies and the applicable state laws.

More: Iowa eases visitor limits

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Which nursing homes had the most coronavirus deaths? N.J. will no longer tell you. Here’s the list.

Nothing captured the despair of the coronavirus outbreak in New Jersey like the Easter Sunday discovery of a makeshift morgue crammed with 17 bodies at one of the state’s largest nursing homes.

The virus rampaged through Andover Subacute and Rehabilitation Center last spring, killing 82 residents and two employees, one of the highest nursing home death tolls in the state.

Yet, the state Health Department’s “data dashboard,” the webpage that chronicles the pandemic’s ongoing toll in the Garden State, on Thursday listed no deaths at the Sussex County facility and just three COVID-19 cases.

In mid-July, state health officials made a decision to take down the total number of deaths at each nursing home, and instead started reporting only deaths and cases as they occurred during an active outbreak.

The only nursing homes, assisted living facilities and other long-term care facilities now listed on the dashboard are the 155 that

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Parson calls for review of Missouri Veterans Homes after deaths of residents from COVID-19 | Politics

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Missouri Governor Mike Parson is calling for a review of coronavirus prevention procedures in the state’s seven veterans homes after the deaths of residents in four of the homes and a spike in cases.

“Data presented to me yesterday in a briefing raised concerns regarding how well Missouri Veterans Homes are uniformly and systematically operating to prevent and, if necessary, contain COVID-19 outbreaks among their staff and residents,” Parson said Friday in a Facebook post.

The homes will also receive 2,400 rapid COVID-19 tests, the governor said.

The Mt. Vernon Veterans Home in southwest Missouri confirmed its first case of COVID-19 the day after Parson visited the facility on September 15. Parson tested positive on September 23, but his staff members do not believe he became infected during the visit. The home has now reported 24 infections among veterans and 12 among staff, according

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Eviction moratorium ends as coronavirus deaths continue to mount

Five days after allowing all businesses in the state to reopen so idled workers can return to their jobs, Gov. Ron DeSantis lifted a moratorium that protected people from losing their homes during the pandemic.



A West Palm Beach Emergency Management employee shows off masks that the city's Fire, Police and Emergency Management Departments are distributing to 17 elementary, middle and high schools in West Palm Beach city limits Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2020. The distribution of approximately 26,000 reusable, washable cloth masks is the city's effort to ensure students in the city have facial coverings when in-person schooling resumes. The masks were donated by Palm Beach County, purchased with funds from the CARES Act. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, also known as the CARES Act, is the $2.2 trillion economic stimulus bill passed by congress. [LANNIS WATERS/palmbeachpost.com]


© Lannis Waters
A West Palm Beach Emergency Management employee shows off masks that the city’s Fire, Police and Emergency Management Departments are distributing to 17 elementary, middle and high schools in West Palm Beach city limits Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2020. The distribution of approximately 26,000 reusable, washable cloth masks is the city’s effort to ensure students in the city have facial coverings when in-person schooling resumes. The masks were donated by Palm Beach County, purchased with funds from the CARES Act. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, also known as the CARES Act, is the $2.2 trillion economic stimulus bill passed by congress. [LANNIS WATERS/palmbeachpost.com]

With a nearly six-month moratorium on evictions

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NJ begins probe of veterans homes as 47 new COVID-19 deaths are revealed

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Veterans groups rally at the Menlo Park veterans home after 62 residents died of Covid-19 on September 16, 2020.

NorthJersey.com

The New Jersey attorney general has requested troves of documents from the Paramus and Menlo Park veterans homes in a far-reaching investigation of their high death tolls during the COVID-19 pandemic, and a state records review has increased total coronavirus deaths at the two state-run facilities to 190.  

The addition of 47 “probable” deaths due to COVID-19 at the two New Jersey veterans homes means that nearly a third of the residents at each home died of confirmed or probable cases of COVID-19. Two nurses aides, one at each of the homes, also died. 

Thirty-nine previously uncounted deaths at the Menlo Park Veterans Memorial Home make its 101 resident deaths the highest now reported at a New Jersey nursing home and the highest among state-run veterans homes nationwide. There

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New Jersey Veterans Homes Likely Failed to Acknowledge Covid-19 as Cause in Dozens of Deaths, Officials Say

A state-run nursing home for veterans in New Jersey failed to attribute nearly 40% of its likely Covid-19 deaths to the virus, according to the state’s own Department of Health.

The Menlo Park Veterans Memorial Home, in Edison, N.J., attributed 62 deaths to the new coronavirus on the website of the state’s veterans’ affairs agency. But a Department of Health spokeswoman, Nancy Kearney, said late Wednesday that an additional 39 people probably died from the virus at the facility during a wave of infections there.

Another state-run veterans home, in Paramus, N.J., also likely had more Covid-19 deaths than the total it attributed to the virus, Ms. Kearney said. The likely undercount at the two facilities, among the deadliest in the state for the virus, was first reported by The Wall Street Journal.

The findings show how publicly reported nursing home mortality figures can fail to reflect the true toll

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Lawsuits Ask: Who’s To Blame For COVID Deaths At Nursing Homes?

There’s no database of case filings, but a COVID-19 complaint tracker posted on the website of the law firm Hunton Andrews Kurth, which is headquartered in Virginia, shows 55 wrongful death lawsuits filed against long-term care facilities across the country as of early September.


ABA Journal:
Coronavirus-Related Deaths In Nursing Homes Prompt Lawsuits And Questions About Who’s Responsible


[Faith] Heimbrodt’s case is one of a growing number of negligence suits being filed across the country against nursing homes and other long-term care facilities by families whose relatives died from the coronavirus while living in such facilities. These cases rely on state nursing home resident protection statutes and/or common law tort theories. … these cases will present unprecedented questions for judges, juries and arbitrators. They will have to decide whether and how to apportion responsibility for the deaths of the nation’s most medically vulnerable population among long-term care operators who were

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COVID-19 outbreaks increase in Iowa nursing homes; deaths climb to 671 | Omaha State and Regional News



Iowa health officials investigating case surge in northwest

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds speaks to reporters after touring the Plymouth Place senior housing facility with Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson on Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020, in Des Moines. 




The number of COVID-19 outbreaks and infections is continuing to climb in Iowa nursing homes, nearly doubling the levels set in July.

In late July, there were 502 infections tied to 20 active nursing home outbreaks in Iowa, the Iowa Capital Dispatch reported. Over the next month, the number of COVID-19 infections associated with active outbreaks increased 66% to 835. Since August, the cumulative total of COVID-19-related deaths in Iowa nursing homes has climbed from 508 to 671.

On Sept. 13, the White House coronavirus task force recommended that Iowa impose a statewide

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