Infection Control Problems Persist in Nursing Homes During COVID


The new analysis draws on self-reported data from nursing homes collected by the federal government over four weeks from late August to late September. While some states fared much worse than others, all 50 states and the District of Columbia had one or more nursing homes that reported inadequate PPE supply, staff shortages, staff infections and resident cases. Forty-seven states reported at least one COVID-19 death among residents.

The analysis found that more than 28,000 residents tested positive for COVID-19 during the four-week reporting period, and more than 5,200 residents died, showing that the virus is still raging in nursing homes. More than 84,000 long-term care residents and staff have died since January, and more than 500,000 residents and staff have contracted the disease, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation’s tally, accounting for roughly 40 percent of the national death toll. Long-term care providers include assisted living, adult day care

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Minn. Guard called in for COVID outbreaks at two nursing homes

In a troubling sign of COVID-19’s resurgence, the Minnesota National Guard has been called in to provide emergency staffing support at two nursing homes struggling to contain large and deadly outbreaks of the respiratory disease.

Over the past 10 days, the National Guard has dispatched small teams of medical professionals to facilities at opposite ends of the state where dozens of residents and staff have been sickened, and where staffing levels became so depleted that they turned to the state for help. Both facilities — one in the southern Minnesota city of Austin and the other on the Iron Range in Hibbing — have active outbreaks and are isolating infected residents in separate COVID-19 units.

The rare deployments come amid an alarming resurgence of COVID-19 across the region and amid mounting evidence that the virus is infiltrating Minnesota’s 2,100 long-term care facilities after declining over the summer. They also reflect

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How Do Real-Estate Agents Show Homes During Covid? With Face Masks, Gloves and Some Ingenuity

Heather T. Roy & Learka Bosnak

Ms. Bosnak: Heather and I have been working together for 15 years and we are very comfortable doing showings together. Then Covid shut everything down. We did a showing and I came back completely frustrated, because we were wearing masks. I felt muzzled. I was constantly running around saying, “I’m smiling under here!” This business is all about rapport, comfort level.

Ms. Roy: We’re like, “We need new skills. We need people to know what we’re thinking, and we also need to know what they’re thinking.” It was almost like we needed a body language expert. I am single and I had met with a couple of matchmakers in L.A. One had her clients meet with a body language expert—Mark Edgar Stephens.

Ms. Bosnak: Heather’s still single, but we love this guy.

Ms. Roy: So we called Mark and told him what we were

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After White Hall case, nursing homes remain key in controlling covid

As covid-19 numbers continue to rise throughout Arkansas and Jefferson County, protecting one of the most vulnerable populations has become a priority on the state level. Nursing home residents were hit hard in the state of Arkansas at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. The first nursing home case was reported by the Arkansas Department of Health on March 25 and was associated with the Waters of White Hall.

Health officials announced that the initial case at The Waters of White Hall appeared to be associated with a case linked to the original cluster at Jefferson Regional Medical Center.

Since then, the nursing home has had 51 positive residents with the most recent one reported to the health department on Oct. 1. Sixteen residents total were also reported as deceased.

In a previous interview, Donna Morton, the facility’s administrator, released a statement describing The Waters of White Hall’s “aggressive and

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Is Florida The Likeliest To Rebound First From COVID?

With Florida governor Ron DeSantis declaring the Sunshine State to enter Phase 3 late last month, restrictions were lifted at the state’s restaurants and other businesses. An unfettered return to business as usual seemed to synch with earlier predictions by real estate experts that Florida would prove the fastest to emerge from the COVID-19 crisis.

Before the pandemic swept in on the country in February and March, a migration to Florida was already underway. The health and financial crisis has only made it more likely the Sunshine State will profit from an array of trends impacting migration. They include the absence of state taxes, lower population density and more wide open spaces, meaning those migrating to Florida have more elbow room in which to hide from the virus.

In addition to Florida attracting newcomers from Latin America, specifically from Mexico,

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Real Estate Market: Rent or Buy a House During Covid? Home Hunters Explain Moves

Maybe it’s too many months living and working in the same cramped quarters. Or the ultra-low mortgage rates. For some, spending less during the pandemic means they finally have enough saved for a down payment.

All that is prompting people to ask themselves whether now is the time to buy a home — even as the long-term outlook for the real-estate market remains uncertain.

There’s been a burst of home buying across the U.S., especially in suburbs outside cities where people were cooped up during the spring Covid-19 lockdown. In August, contracts to buy single-family houses in Greenwich, Connecticut, nearly tripled from a year earlier. Contracts were up 57% in nearby Westchester County.

Homes Get Scarce

The supply of single-family homes in the U.S. is getting tight

Capital Economics Ltd., U.S. Census, National Association of Realtors

The U.S. market is so hot that the supply of homes for sale is

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Nearly three times more COVID deaths in Mississippi’s for-profit nursing homes, analysis shows | State Government

Twice as many residents caught COVID-19 at Mississippi’s for-profit nursing homes, and nearly three times more died there, an analysis of health data by the Mississippi Center for Investigative Reporting shows.

The average number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in these for-profit homes? Four in 10 residents.

One possible factor: 80% of Mississippi’s nursing homes had already been cited for infection-control problems before the pandemic hit.

Charlene Harrington, a professor emeritus at the University of California at San Francisco who discovered similar results in a just-released study of nursing homes in California, said the current pandemic is exposing problems that have persisted for decades. “We’ve just looked the other way for 30 years,” she said.

OSHA has been investigating three nursing homes in Mississippi, all of them for-profit, for workplace catastrophes or fatalities, including Lakeside Health & Rehabilitation Center in Quitman. One of the home’s nursing assistants, Carole Faye Doby of

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Dr Birx says Covid is now spreading in homes and she fears upticks in some of best-performing states

A member of the White House coronavirus response task force and one of the nation’s leading doctors warned a “very different” coronavirus spread was underway across the US than the one the country faced during the initial months of the global pandemic.



Deborah Birx wearing a suit and tie


© Provided by The Independent


The United States was experiencing a “very different” spread of the novel coronavirus in recent months than the wave of infections that swept over the country during the initial months of the global pandemic, a member of the White House coronavirus response task force has warned.

Dr Deborah Birx, one of the nation’s leading physicians, said Covid-19 was now spreading among Americans at social events — including family gatherings — where people are “taking their mask off and letting down their guard”.

Whereas the virus initially infected people in confined work spaces, on public transit and at large events, Dr Birx said many

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Covid drives historic demand for life sciences real estate and these REITs, report says

  • Venture-capital investment in the life sciences sector grew to a record rolling annual total of $17.8 billion in the second quarter.
  • Covid-19 is accelerating an already growing demand for real estate in the sector.
  • “The biotech sector may be the single most attractive subsector within commercial real estate today,” said Spencer Levy, chairman of Americas research and senior economic advisor for CBRE.



a person standing in a room: Research associate Sachi Johnson works at Sorrento Therapeutics where efforts are underway to develop an antibody, STI-1499, to help in prevention of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in San Diego, California, May 22, 2020.


© Provided by CNBC
Research associate Sachi Johnson works at Sorrento Therapeutics where efforts are underway to develop an antibody, STI-1499, to help in prevention of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in San Diego, California, May 22, 2020.

All the fundamentals are aligning for the life sciences industry, as Covid-19 accelerates already growing demand for real estate in the sector.

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Rents are rising for lab space, vacancies are plunging and research and development, and employment and new development are expanding further, thanks to strong venture capital investment. 

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UV cabinet that zaps Covid ‘could become fixture of UK homes’ | Business

A “disinfection” cabinet that zaps coronavirus could be this Christmas’s must-have gadget as manufacturers tap into demand for professional levels of hygiene in the home.

The UV cleaning cabinet, which resembles a microwave and costs £199, is one of a range of anti-coronavirus appliances being put on the market by the electrical brand Beko.

The appliance-maker thinks the metal box, which uses UV light, could become a fixture in British hallways. The device can be used to kill bacteria and viruses on the surfaces of personal effects such as keys, mobile phones, bags and toys.

The Hygiene Shield range, which also includes a fridge with a disinfection drawer and tumble dryer with a UV setting, was rushed into production after a poll of Beko customers in 31 countries found widespread concerns about domestic hygiene. The range is designed, it said, to provide consumers with “peace of mind that their homes

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