Successful Subcontractor-Contractor Agreements | Contractor

By Christopher G. Aiello

A subcontractor – contractor agreement is used when a contractor hires someone else (known as a subcontractor) to help with a specific task on a  project. For example, an HVAC expert may be brought in to replace the central heating for a home under renovation.

Sub-contractor agreements are formal written documents that outline the terms and scope of work for the sub-contractor in a project. They spell out the duties of the contractors and subcontractors and how they should relate with each other until the project is concluded.

These documents are useful in case a dispute arises, to prove what the contractor and subcontractor agreed on. The agreements save subcontractors time and money, helping to work out difficulties formally.

When committing to such agreements, a subcontractor should keep the following pointers in mind.

What should be in a Subcontractor – Contractor agreement?

1.  The scope of

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Oklahoma contractor raises red flags with Nebraska homeowner

OMAHA, Neb. (WOWT) – An Oklahoma contractor has been making cold calls in rural Nebraska. He’s offering farmers and acreage owners a great deal to improve their driveways.

A friendly stranger pulls onto Mike Pratt’s property and promises that when chips are down, he’ll have a smoother driveway.

Sylvester Cooper, driveway contractor said, “Its tar and chip. We spread a high asphalt down and put the gravel over the top of it.”

Tar and Chip Asphalt Company rolls out a bargain for Mike.

Sylvester Cooper said, “I’ve got enough to cover 100 square yards. Bottom line? A thousand dollars for 100 square yards.”

All contractors doing business in Nebraska are required to register with the state labor department, but Tar and Chip Asphalt are not on the list.

Jim Hegarty with the Better Business Bureau said, “And we clearly know this particular contractor was not licensed to do this kind

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FBI, state agents raid Borrego Community Healthcare Foundation and El Cajon billing contractor

State and federal agents raided the offices Tuesday of the Borrego Community Healthcare Foundation, a nonprofit provider in Borrego Springs that last year billed more than $300 million in medical, dental and other services to the U.S. government.

Dozens of agents turned up at the organization’s administrative offices on Palm Canyon Drive first thing in the morning, seizing computers and boxes of medical records and interviewing employees who were not alerted to the search in advance.

Investigators also closed off the Borrego Medical Clinic a few miles to the southeast of the downtown Borrego Springs area, carting away files and other material.

Separate search warrants were executed at the foundation’s administrative offices off Sky Park Court in Kearny Mesa and at the El Cajon headquarters of Premier Healthcare Management, a management services company that provides billing and other services to the nonprofit.

FBI spokeswoman Davene Butler acknowledged warrants were served

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Retail giant Best Buy retailer won’t pay for fridge flood its own contractor caused | 7 On Your Side

ELTINGVILLE, Staten Island (WABC) — When a new fridge flooded and caused thousands of dollars in damage, a young couple says a retail giant turned its back on them.

“To be honest I was so upset, I couldn’t even handle it,” Jason Anello said.

Welcome to Jason and Abby Anello’s newlywed nightmare. Their new home was ruined before he could even carry her over the threshold.

“It’s just been a big headache,” Anello said.

He’s talking about the thousands in water damage due to a faulty fridge installation.

The listing for their Staten Island home caught their eye and features an open floor plan with a big kitchen and hardwood floors. So, they bought it.

“We put a lot of money into the house with renovations,” said Anello.

RELATED | 7 On Your Side: Young car-buyer wrangled into a ripoff

One of the expenses included a fancy new fridge from

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Why hire a contractor if subcontractors do all the work?

Good contractors can bring piece of mind, knowledge of industry standards and project management expertise. But they also bring tangible, necessary things to the job: a license, insurance and worker’s compensation. If you act as the general contractor yourself, you assume liability for injuries and property damage.

Perhaps the most stress relief comes from the fact that the general contractor is responsible for the quality of all the work he or she oversees as part of the contract. If something goes wrong during the construction, it’s up to the general contractor to get it fixed. The cost of those repairs comes o­ut of the contract budget, not your pocket.

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Knowledge of building codes, appropriate materials, proper construction methods and safety — both during and after construction — also is a key resource that a general contractor brings to your project. This knowledge saves you the time and trouble of

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State of Oregon: Contractor tools

When written contracts are required

  • All contracts on a residential structure that exceed $2,000 must be written. 
  • If the original contract price is less than $2,000 but the price goes up during the project and eventually exceeds $2,000,  you must provide the owner a written contract within five days. (ORS 701.305) 
  • If you do not have a written contract as required, you cannot claim a lien. (ORS 87.037) 

Put all contracts in writing 

A well-written contract helps avoid homeowner complaints. It protects both you and the consumer by specifying what has been agreed to. 

Required terms

If you work on residential properties, you must include the following in your written contract: 

  • Your name, address, phone number, and CCB license number (as shown on CCB records)
  • The customer’s name and address where the work will be performed
  • A description of the work to be performed, the
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Air Force to pay $25 million after accidentally killing contractor in F-16 strafing run

An F-16 Viper assigned to the 311th Fighter Squadron, takes off from Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico, July 27, 2020

The U.S. government will pay $24.6 million to the widow of an Air Force contractor who was killed after an F-16 accidentally strafed his position with 20mm rounds, court records show.

Retired Master Sgt. Charles “Chuck” Holbrook, a former Tactical Air Control Party airman turned defense contractor, was killed during a nighttime live-fire training exercise at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico on January 31, 2017.

Holbrook was killed “when an F-16 student pilot mistook the line of rental cars for the similarly aligned target and was ordered to fire at the group, blowing up one of the rental cars and striking Holbrook in the head with a 20mm round,” according to court documents. 

Holbrook died several hours later at

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Government Contractor Jobs, Employment | Indeed.com

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Spearpoint Logistics LLC is a Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business, specializing in government service contracts. We are currently seeking resumes of…



$43.72 an hour

  • Developing a civil rights focused culture throughout programs and activities conducted directly by FEMA, contractors on behalf of FEMA, and those receiving…
  • Contact Federal employees and contractors to schedule card pick-ups and activations.
  • The candidate will provide credential administration and support to…

San Francisco, CA

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  • Retired and former government workers are welcomed!
  • This job requires the chosen applicant to be available 1-2 times a week for a few hours each day.



$12 an hour

  • All applicants should be 18 years of age and possess a valid government ID.
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$12.50 an hour

  • All applicants should be 18 years of age and possess a valid government ID.
  • The Claims Support
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Unlicensed security guard in shooting was independent contractor

Charges for Matthew Dolloff, 30 will be filed Monday.

DENVER — EDITOR’S NOTE: 9NEWS is used to covering many different kinds of stories, but usually we’re not directly involved in them. For this reason, A.J. Lagoe from our sister station KARE in Minneapolis is covering the initial stages of the shooting and investigation.

Matthew Dolloff, 30 is facing second-degree murder charges following the shooting and killing of Lee Keltner, 49, during dueling Denver rallies on Saturday.

Dolloff was working as a security guard providing protection for a 9NEWS producer who was filming the rallies. 

The city said Dolloff was not licensed to work security in Denver at all. 

RELATED: What are the security guard training requirements in Denver?

RELATED: Investigation: 9NEWS has used multiple unlicensed security guards

Security by 9NEWS was contracted through an agency named Pinkerton, who released a statement that Dolloff was an agent from another company.

This

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Air Force Settles $25 Million Lawsuit for F-16 Strafing Run That Killed Contractor

Editor’s Note: Randi McGinn, the family’s lawyer, told Military.com on Friday that the family has settled for an undisclosed amount less than $25 million. “$25 million was the initial demand, but the case was never settled for what the demand was,” McGinn said in a phone call, but would not disclose the new amount, citing family privacy. “They have enough to take care of them for the rest of their lives,” she added. The article and headline have been updated to reflect this new reporting.

A district judge ruled this week ruled that the U.S. Air Force was responsible for the death of a U.S. contractor accidentally killed during a live-fire training exercise.

Charles Holbrook, a retired master sergeant and former Tactical Air Control Party airman, died Jan. 31, 2017, at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, after an F-16 Fighting Falcon student pilot incorrectly identified the target location during

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