I signed my home over to my daughter temporarily to protect it during my divorce. Now I’m 69 and living in an RV. Can I file for elder abuse?

Dear Moneyist,

In 2009, when the property market was crashing, I added both my daughters to the deed of my home so I would not lose the home to foreclosure during my divorce and, in case something happened to me, my daughters could keep the home.

It was only to be a temporary fix until I could finally sell the home, and both daughters agreed to sign off on the deed. By adding my daughter it allowed me to use her income to qualify for a loan modification. I, not my daughters, made all the payments. Fast forward to 2019.

My eldest daughter had received more than $760,000 for the sale of two homes that were given to her by her deceased former mother-in-law. This daughter has always spent her money foolishly and has terrible credit. Even with all this money, no one would rent to her because of her

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18,000 elderly people have died of COVID-19 in British care homes and now Boris Johnson’s government is being accused of human rights abuse



a man and a woman standing in front of a mirror: Care worker Sarah Cox helps fix care home resident, Patricia Taylor's hair on May 6, 2020 in Borehamwood, England Getty


© Getty
Care worker Sarah Cox helps fix care home resident, Patricia Taylor’s hair on May 6, 2020 in Borehamwood, England Getty

  • The death of thousands of COVID-19 in British care homes was a violation of their human rights, according to Amnesty International.
  • The human rights organization has now called for the public inquiry, promised by the government in July, to begin immediately. 
  • The report also raised particular concerns about the inappropriate use of “do not attempt resuscitation” (DNAR) orders issued on a blanket basis in care homes.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

More than 18,000 untested elderly people died of COVID-19 in British care homes in what a damning new report from Amnesty International has described as a violation of their human rights.

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Between March and June, over 28,116 “excess deaths” were recorded in care homes in England, with 18,500 of them confirmed to have

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Kurn Hattin Homes for Children Pressured to Surrender License Amid Investigations of Abuse, Reports A Case for Women

Kurn Hattin Voluntarily Gives Up License to Operate as a Residential Treatment Facility

In mid-September of this year, Kurn Hattin Homes for Children was pressured to give up its license to operate as a residential treatment facility after an investigation by the Department for Children and Families uncovered that the school failed to report instances of sexual abuse, reports A Case for Women.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201005005888/en/

Susan Knape, Founder of A Case for Women. (Photo: Business Wire)

And sadly, this investigation is only the tip of the iceberg. Dozens of former Kurn Hattin students have accused school staff and administrators of physical and sexual abuse, stretching back decades. According to documents associated with a pending lawsuit against Kurn Hattin, more than 60 children were allegedly assaulted by caregivers, administrators or peers at the school from the 1940s through 2019. Even worse, this

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