What Buying a House “As Is” Really Means

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You found a house in your dream neighborhood. It has the right number of bedrooms, bathrooms and a nice backyard. It’s just what you were looking for.

Then you learn it is being sold “as is.” That house that seemed so perfect now seems a bit frightening.

Follow these 100 tips when buying a house.

Selling as house “as is” basically means the seller will make no repairs or improvements and is selling the house in its current condition, according to realtor.com. In many cases, the houses are “as is” because the seller can’t afford to make the improvements.

Learn how to inspect your home like a home inspector.

“Once you buy that house, it’s yours and you’re pretty much stuck with whatever decision you made, so you really need to be very educated and thorough about what you’re doing,” said David Tamny, owner of Professional Property Inspection

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Contractor’s Liens – FindLaw

A contractor’s lien (often known as a mechanic’s lien, or a construction lien) is a claim made by contractors or subcontractors who have performed work on a property, and have not yet been paid. A supplier of materials delivered to the job may also file a mechanic’s lien. In some states, professionals such as architects, engineers, and surveyors may also be entitled to file a lien for services rendered on a home improvement project.

The best way to avoid a contractor’s lien, of course, is paying your invoice on time. But if you are unable to pay or need more time, you may avoid a lien just by talking to the contractor and negotiating a payment plan. After all, contractors would rather work out a deal than go through the hassle of filing a lien

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Condos for Rent in Philadelphia PA

Nestled along the banks of the Delaware River near the Pennsylvania-New Jersey state line, the historic city of Philadelphia played a major role in the fight for independence, even serving as the nation’s capital for a brief period. Today, Philly’s rich history blends seamlessly with its modern, progressive spirit, forming a one-of-a-kind urban experience. As one of the nation’s largest cities, you’ll discover a variety of bustling businesses, such as the Philadelphia Stock Exchange, the country’s oldest stock exchange.

The University of Pennsylvania, the Philadelphia International Airport, and a multitude of historical landmarks and tourist attractions reside in this urban oasis. Admire the historic Liberty Bell, explore the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and take a trip to the famous Philadelphia Zoo. Enjoy the waterfront at Franklin D. Roosevelt Park, snap a picture at the Magic Gardens, or soak in the unique identities of the varied neighborhoods of the city.

Residents

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First-time buyers, here is your buying a house timeline

Timing is crucial when buying a house. Getting it wrong could mean paying on a mortgage when you still owe rent—or living out of a hotel if your closing runs longer than your lease. Here’s a timeline for what to expect from your home-buying journey so that you can get it right.

How long does it take to buy a house?

The buying a house timeline can be tricky to predict. It typically takes anywhere from four weeks at the low end to six months (or more) to shop for and close on a house. But it can be quicker if you make a strong offer right away in a fast-moving market or slower if you have a hard time finding just the right place or keep getting outbid.​ The shopping step is one of the biggest house-buying timeline variables. According to Zillow research, about half of buyers searched for

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Buying a House with No Credit

buying a house with no credit

By Zina Kumok, Financial Health Counselor, Credit Counselor

If you listen to certain financial experts, it’s easy to get the wrong idea about credit. Many money gurus – most notably Dave Ramsey – advise consumers to avoid credit cards and other forms of personal debt.

That might seem responsible enough, until you start shopping for a mortgage with no credit history and have to overcome that barrier.

Thankfully, it’s still possible, though not necessarily easy, for someone without credit to secure a mortgage and buy a house.

Here’s what you need to know.

In this article

What does no credit mean?

In a world of student loans, auto loans and credit cards, it’s hard to imagine not having any debt. But it is possible to live with no credit, especially if you’re young and have avoided loans your whole life.

If you’re debt-free and use debit cards instead of credit

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Why Buying a Home Is a Smart Investment for Millennials

Millennials are swarmed with investing advice – start saving early, take advantage of your employer’s 401(k) match and for heaven’s sake, dump those high-interest credit cards! But for many who are looking to build a retirement nest egg, financial advisors say purchasing a home is one of the best investments millennials can make.

“Buying a home is one of the smartest financial decisions you can make as early as your 20s,” says Riccardo Ravasini, managing director of Rava Realty, who handles properties in New York and Florida, “because it is inflation-protected and a physical asset that doesn’t disappear like stocks can do.”

Nationwide, millennials have been reluctant to buy homes for various reasons, including a volatile job market, high student debt and the delaying of life events, such as marriage. The rate of homeownership for millennials dipped to a low of 36.2 percent in 2014, according to U.S. Census data,

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Buying a House After Bankruptcy? How Long to Wait and What to Do

Securing a home loan and buying a house after bankruptcy may sound like an impossible feat. Blame it on all those Monopoly games, but bankruptcy has a very bad rap, painting the filer as someone who should never be loaned money.

The reality is that of the 800,000 Americans who file for bankruptcy every year, most are well-intentioned, responsible people. Life has thrown them a curveball, however, that has left them struggling to pay off their past debts.

Sometimes, filing for bankruptcy is the only way out of a crushing financial situation, and taking this step can really help cash-strapped individuals get back on their feet.

And yes, many go on to buy a home eventually, despite the challenging credit score that results from bankruptcy. But how? Being aware of what a lender expects after a bankruptcy will help you navigate the mortgage application process efficiently and effectively.

Here are

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Best & Worst Time to Buy a House: Month-by-Month Analysis

The United States housing market has rebounded from the 2008 crash. If you bought a property at the lowest point of the recession and still own it, your asset has likely appreciated by 25% or more. The housing market is predicted to decline in 2020, so what is the best month to buy a house?

To help you decide, we compiled historical national housing data from the Federal Reserve, Census Bureau, National Association of Realtors (NAR), and Zillow. We then determined the best and worst time to get a deal on a house. We also discuss other factors that buyers may want to consider when timing their purchase, such as the number of homes on the market.

Best & Worst Months to Buy a Home

The real estate experts we talked with said price was the main determinant when deciding what is the best month to buy a house. Buyers

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Here’s What it’s Really Like to Buy a House During a Pandemic

Editor’s note: All of HomeLight’s coronavirus information for buyers, sellers, and agents is available on our COVID-19 hub.

If you’d been planning on buying a house before coronavirus, how has the pandemic changed the homebuying experience? Getting an inspection and an appraisal could be a challenge, and your closing might be delayed. But reading about what could happen is different than knowing what has happened to other buyers.

Here are four stories about buying a home during coronavirus. Each homebuyer faced unique challenges — everything from the risk of water getting turned off in their new home to picking out countertops remotely — and their stories can give you a good idea of what to expect when you’re expecting… to buy a house during a pandemic.

A house bought during coronavirus.
Source: (Jen Trail / Ruum Media)

Buying a house that needed city sign-off

Agent Bonnie Roseman, who works with 82% more single-family homes than

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8 Steps to Buying a House in Maryland

Make buying a house in Maryland as simple as possible. Follow these 8 steps to find the right home and get a great deal, despite the current seller’s market in Maryland.

Buying a house is exciting, but it’s by no means easy. Everything from the local economy to your financials to the housing market in Maryland will impact what home you buy and how much it costs.

The more you know about the steps to buying a house and the current real estate trends in Maryland, the better you’ll be able to navigate your choices.

Read on to get all of the information you need to make it through the home buying process. Then, you can confidently put in an offer on your dream home and know you’re getting the best deal.

Don’t navigate the home buying process alone.

Clever can match you with the perfect realtor to get the

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