Remembering Herndon History: Sears & Roebuck Homes in Herndon

In the early 1990s the Town of Herndon’s Heritage Preservation District was accepted into the U.S. Department of Interior’s National Register of Historic Places.

The Heritage Preservation District (sometimes referred to as the Historic District) is a geographic area in the town of Herndon that was created in the 1980s for the purpose of protecting its remaining historic structures, some of which had been previously lost to demolition in earlier years. However, the maxim “not everything old is historic” was widely accepted.

Under a grant from the Virginia Department of Historic resources, Frazier Associates from Staunton, Virginia, was hired by the town to conduct an architectural survey of the historic properties within the town limits. According to the town’s Heritage Preservation Handbook, the findings of that survey indicated that “of the 245 properties that were surveyed, 83% of them were considered contributing to the historic character of the community.” Also,

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22 Tons of Original Classics Illustrated Engraving Plates for Sale by Jack Lake Productions Inc.

TORONTO, Oct. 1, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — From 1941 till 1967, Albert Kanter and the Gilberton Publishing Company produced 298 Classic Comics/Classics Illustrated titles in the United States. In 1964, a West Coast financier, Patrick Frawley, read a Classics Illustrated comic belonging to one of his children and was thus prompted to telephone the Gilberton Company to negotiate the purchase of the property. Albert Kanter signed off on the deal in December of 1967 for $500,000 USD. (That’s about 4 million U.S. dollars in today’s market.)

The interior zinc CMYK plates, now belonging to Frawley Corp, were stored in a Bronx warehouse. These engraving plates were metal reproductions of the artwork. All proofs, mats and electros were made from these engraving plates. Most of the copper engraving plates for the CI cover artwork are currently held by a collector in Michigan.

In August of 2011, First

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Opinion | We should be just as careful about covid-19 in relatives’ homes as we are in grocery stores

As the fall school term approached, universities thought that they could effectively implement similar protocols on campus. They instituted safeguards including reduced class size, improved classroom ventilation and daily symptom checks. The problem? Students got infected when they engaged in risky behaviors off-campus. At the University of New Hampshire, 11 cases were traced to a fraternity party hosting about 100 guests without masks. Medical degrees apparently provide no guarantee of safe gathering: A single party resulted in covid-19 infections in 18 anesthesiology residents and fellows training at the University of Florida.

At K-12 institutions, the hard work administrators and teachers are doing to enforce mask-wearing and physical distancing will be undone if kids gather after school without similar protections. The risk extends to parents, and increases as families come together with friends and relatives with whom they are likely to let down their guard.

I spoke this week with several

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Eviction moratorium ends as coronavirus deaths continue to mount

Five days after allowing all businesses in the state to reopen so idled workers can return to their jobs, Gov. Ron DeSantis lifted a moratorium that protected people from losing their homes during the pandemic.



A West Palm Beach Emergency Management employee shows off masks that the city's Fire, Police and Emergency Management Departments are distributing to 17 elementary, middle and high schools in West Palm Beach city limits Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2020. The distribution of approximately 26,000 reusable, washable cloth masks is the city's effort to ensure students in the city have facial coverings when in-person schooling resumes. The masks were donated by Palm Beach County, purchased with funds from the CARES Act. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, also known as the CARES Act, is the $2.2 trillion economic stimulus bill passed by congress. [LANNIS WATERS/palmbeachpost.com]


© Lannis Waters
A West Palm Beach Emergency Management employee shows off masks that the city’s Fire, Police and Emergency Management Departments are distributing to 17 elementary, middle and high schools in West Palm Beach city limits Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2020. The distribution of approximately 26,000 reusable, washable cloth masks is the city’s effort to ensure students in the city have facial coverings when in-person schooling resumes. The masks were donated by Palm Beach County, purchased with funds from the CARES Act. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, also known as the CARES Act, is the $2.2 trillion economic stimulus bill passed by congress. [LANNIS WATERS/palmbeachpost.com]

With a nearly six-month moratorium on evictions

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Stunning House For Sale In Homewood With Sunroom And Game Room

HOMEWOOD, IL — This stunning house in Homewood has a sunroom, red oak hardwood floors, a game room, beautiful landscape and more. This house is available on Realtor.com and has four bedrooms, three bathrooms and two half bathrooms. See more information about this 5,818 square foot beauty below.

  • Address: 2437 Ravisloe Ln, Homewood, Illinois
  • Price: $523,500
  • Square Feet: 5818
  • Bedrooms: 4
  • Bathrooms: 3 Full and 2 Half Baths
  • Built: 2001
  • Features: What more could YOU WANT! This house has everything. Brick, stone and stucco presents this custom made home. Built by the owner who is a carpenter/contractor the different woods used will amaze. Red Oak hardwood floors, mahogany and cherry. Start with the stamped concrete walks surrounded by beautiful landscapes. Walk into the 2 story foyer and you notice the open concept. Living room allows a beautiful view of the golf course. Fireplace for those winter nights. Formal dining room
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Oregon wildfires burned $1 billion in homes and belongings last month, new tally finds

Oregonians lost nearly $1 billion in homes and belongings during last month’s wildfires, which torched more than 4,000 residences and burned more than 1 million acres across the state, according to a new report.



a bench in front of a fence: Wildfire damage in Gates, Oregon off Highway 22 in Marion County on Monday, Sept. 21, 2020. Wildfires ripped through the small town of less than 500 people a little over a week ago, destroying many homes and businesses. Sean Meagher/Staff


© Sean Meagher/The Oregonian/oregonlive.com/TNS
Wildfire damage in Gates, Oregon off Highway 22 in Marion County on Monday, Sept. 21, 2020. Wildfires ripped through the small town of less than 500 people a little over a week ago, destroying many homes and businesses. Sean Meagher/Staff

It’s among the first efforts to calculate the economic toll of the fires, which also killed at least nine people last month.

Josh Lehner of the Oregon Office of Economic Analysis said the homes and personal property destroyed are only the initial calculation of what the state lost. The wildfires damaged the state’s outdoor recreation industry, its timber sector and the state’s image as a healthy, active place to live – and

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Engie Pushes Back Deadline for Sale of Suez Stake to Veolia

(Bloomberg) — Engie SA pushed back the deadline for accepting Veolia Environnement SA’s 3.4 billion-euro ($4 billion) bid for most of its stake in Suez SA, though there were limited signs the delay would ease the tensions between the French corporate giants.



a sign on the side of a building: An Engie SA logo sits on display at the French energy giant’s Crigen gas, new energy and emerging technology research and development center in Stains, France, on Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020. Veolia Environnement SA last month offered to buy 29.9% of Suez SA from French utility Engie for 2.9 billion euros ($3.4 billion), the first step to taking full control.


© Bloomberg
An Engie SA logo sits on display at the French energy giant’s Crigen gas, new energy and emerging technology research and development center in Stains, France, on Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020. Veolia Environnement SA last month offered to buy 29.9% of Suez SA from French utility Engie for 2.9 billion euros ($3.4 billion), the first step to taking full control.

The extension to Oct. 5 gives Veolia extra time to formalize talks with Suez, potentially allowing for a smoother acquisition. But Suez has shown scant inclination to engage in discussions, saying Thursday it backed an alternative approach from private equity firm Ardian SAS — one that

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Train Car for Sale in Marfa, TX, Could Be a Cool Getaway Plan

The tiny town of Marfa wasn’t always a hip area for artists. Before the migration of creative types to this small speck of desert in west Texas, Marfa was a train city with lines rumbling right through town.

Even today, “the train is such a presence in Marfa,” says Lauren Meader Fowlkes of Far West Texas Realty. She’s the listing agent for a decommissioned caboose now on the market for $285,000. “We’re a town built around the rail line.”

Now, in a fun nod to the town’s railroad history, this Santa Fe Railroad steel caboose seeks a new owner. Built in 1948 as one of three for the rail company, the caboose was pulled out of service in 1984. The train car weighs just shy of 60,000 pounds.

The current owner has owned the caboose for years.

“She bought it for her 40th birthday,” explains Meader Fowlkes. “They’ve had it

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Lakeland’s ‘iconic’ swans for sale due to safety, reducing costs

Later this month, around 30 of the beloved swans at Lake Morton in downtown Lakeland, Florida will be for sale to the general public.



a swan next to a body of water


© Provided by NBC News


“The magic number that we try to keep our swans around is about 65, and we’re suspecting that we have got well over 80 right now,” Kevin Cook, director of communications for the city of Lakeland, told NBC News.

Cook said that swans have inhabited the lake since about 1923. However, after the last remaining swan had a run-in with an alligator in 1954, the lake was left swanless — until a concerned resident wrote to Queen Elizabeth of England asking for a donation of two of her swans.

The Queen agreed to donate a pair of her mute swans, and they arrived at Lake Morton in 1957.

Today, at least 80 mute swans reside in the densely-populated lake, raising

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Public funding for political parties makes sense

Doug Ford resurrected unseemly political fundraising. Let’s hope COVID-19 kills it for good, Cohn, Sept. 23

Star columnist Martin Regg Cohn has outlined a very real problem with the funding model for our political parties. His statement that “public funding is an idea whose time has come” should be a rallying cry for improving our democracy and a path to avoiding the dark money that so distorts the U.S. elections.

However, simply keeping the “per vote” public subsidy should not be the goal.

An analogy for this would be where the strongest team in the NHL is awarded the top draft pick. Essentially that is what the “per vote” subsidy accomplishes: more money and thus more influence to the strongest parties. Rather, we need a model where the ideas and platform of the less popular parties are given equal opportunity to reach the voting public: funding should not only be

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